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    Malcolm Kendrick

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    Re: Malcolm Kendrick

    Post by chris c on Wed Jul 19 2017, 23:41

    And another new post already

    https://drmalcolmkendrick.org/2017/07/16/diabetes-unpacked-a-new-book/

    This looks excellent and I'll probably buy sight unseen. Reviews so far are good.

    I know Bernstein of course, and there are some books on Type 1 by doctors which are well recommended, but prior to this (unless anyone knows different) most of the worthwhile books on Type 2 have been by diabetics themselves - Gretchen Becker, Janet Ruhl (Jenny), Alan Shanley.

    This is actually written by doctors who have Clue.
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    Re: Malcolm Kendrick

    Post by Jan1 on Mon Jul 31 2017, 13:06

    @chris c wrote:And another new post already

    https://drmalcolmkendrick.org/2017/07/16/diabetes-unpacked-a-new-book/

    This looks excellent and I'll probably buy sight unseen. Reviews so far are good.

    I know Bernstein of course, and there are some books on Type 1 by doctors which are well recommended, but prior to this (unless anyone knows different) most of the worthwhile books on Type 2 have been by diabetics themselves - Gretchen Becker, Janet Ruhl (Jenny), Alan Shanley.

    This is actually written by doctors who have Clue.

    Eddie has been sent a complimentary copy and asked to review the book.
    He say's it's a good read so far ...

    All the best Jan

    PS Thank your lucky stars you were not a chimney sweep, Eddie will go into details later Shocked
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    Re: Malcolm Kendrick

    Post by Jan1 on Wed Sep 06 2017, 17:34

    Can you believe it!
    Dr M Kendrik is now up to part 36 in his series ...

    What causes heart disease part XXXVI (part thirty-six)

    He certainly gives reasons for thoughts and comments - 152 so far, and rising.

    His Part thirty five of this series had over 600 replies

    His blog is here
    https://drmalcolmkendrick.org/

    Part thirty six of 'What Causes Heart Disease' is here
    https://drmalcolmkendrick.org/2017/09/05/what-causes-heart-disease-part-xxxvi-part-thirty-six/

    All the best Jan
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    Re: Malcolm Kendrick

    Post by chris c on Wed Sep 06 2017, 23:06

    Damn and buggeration, I just can't keep up with the guy! He's also amassed an excellent group of commentators.
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    Re: Malcolm Kendrick

    Post by Jan1 on Fri Oct 20 2017, 13:13

    Dr Malcolm Kendrik is giving a presentation at this conference* in London on the 25th of November, if any of the readers of his blog are interested in attending, he says it would be great to see you there. This is mainly in the area of cancer, but he is looking at how we have reached a situation where hugely expensive ‘pharma developed drugs’ are widely used, when many are completely ineffective. However, novel ideas, new ways of looking at cancer, are blocked at every turn.

    *See more here
    https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/starting-the-conversation-exploring-ways-in-which-integrating-conventional-cancer-care-and-tickets-37659106401

    All the best Jan

    PS Dr Kendrik's blog can be found here
    https://drmalcolmkendrick.org/
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    Re: Malcolm Kendrick

    Post by chris c on Fri Oct 20 2017, 21:58

    I'm considering employing someone to read his blog for me, it's sucking up so much time, and probably the best of the bunch at the moment.
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    Re: Malcolm Kendrick

    Post by chris c on Sat Nov 11 2017, 01:10

    Oh good grief, I just finally got caught up on his post #40 on heart disease, which is why I am up so late. Well I did crash out for a while earlier.

    For years now I've tended to crash out soon after my meal, then get up again and mostly read and watch TV before going back to bed again. I only discovered relatively recently that having "two sleeps" was a historical thing. Well like eating low carb Real Food it seems to work for me.
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    Re: Malcolm Kendrick

    Post by Jan1 on Mon Nov 13 2017, 12:19

    I see Dr Malcolm Kendrick is now up to part 41 in his heart disease series.

    ... and Chris you've already read it and left your comment Smile

    For others who may not have see the article it's here
    https://drmalcolmkendrick.org/2017/11/12/what-causes-cvd-part-xl1-part-forty-one/

    All the best Jan

    PS I think Malcolm has a full time job reading all of his comments - his last post got over 760 !
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    Re: Malcolm Kendrick

    Post by chris c on Mon Nov 13 2017, 22:04

    @Jan1 wrote:

    PS I think Malcolm has a full time job reading all of his comments - his last post got over 760 !

    Yes and half of them are from what I reckon is a really clever troll, he works tirelessly to turn every post into a discussion of Michael Greger and vegan diets while claiming NOT to eat one himself.

    "For next week's exercise we will attempt to lift a fork and a knife at the same time"

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    Re: Malcolm Kendrick

    Post by Jan1 on Tue Dec 12 2017, 19:10

    More from Dr Malcolm Kendrick ...

    What causes heart disease part XLII (forty two)

    9th December 2017

    Stress/strain – again

    It has been a long time since my last blog, but life can get in the way of other things. Three lectures to give, a deadline for my book and revalidations. The latter a complete pain that UK doctors have to go through every five years, which means gathering together evidence of all the things I have done, the learning I have learned, the hoops I have jumped through – and suchlike.

    Then, my cousin dropped dead of a cerebral haemorrhage. At least he died doing something he enjoyed. He had just holed a putt on a golf course near Edinburgh, when his number came up in the great lottery of life. It reminds me that whatever we know, however much we learn, fate rules us all, and makes a mockery of our belief that we can control everything. ‘As flies to wanton boys are we to the gods.’

    In this blog, I am going to return to stress, which I prefer to call strain.

    Just after writing my last blog someone was kind enough to send me information about a study that had been done, showing that people who are under financial stress are thirteen times more likely to die of cardiovascular disease, and people in stressful jobs are six times as likely to have a heart attack. Not yet published research, but presented at a conference in South Africa. You may have read it.

    As those who have read my blog over the years will know, I have long argued that chronic negative stress is, from a population perspective, the single most important driver of cardiovascular disease. The mind/body connection is key to health, and thus, illness. This, I think I further emphasised by the point that mental illness is associated with the greatest impact on life expectancy.

    ‘Serious mental illnesses reduce life expectancy by 10 to 20 years, an analysis by Oxford University psychiatrists has shown – a loss of years that’s equivalent to or worse than that for heavy smoking….
    …The average reduction in life expectancy in people with bipolar disorder is between nine and 20 years, while it is 10 to 20 years for schizophrenia, between nine and 24 years for drug and alcohol abuse, and around seven to 11 years for recurrent depression.’

    Up to twenty years reduction in life expectancy.

    Yes, when your mind goes wrong, your body follows, with disastrous consequences for physical health. Of course, there is overlap between mental illness, drug use, smoking and suchlike. However, you can strip all the other things out, and you are left with the ferocious power of the mind/body connection. The power to nurture, and the power to destroy.

    I usually tell anyone, still listening after I have bored them on various other issues, that health is a combination of physical, psychological and social wellbeing. Three overlapping sets. The holy Trinity of wellbeing. You must get them all right, or nothing works. As Plato noted, a few years back, “the part can never be well unless the whole is well.”

    Who are the shortest-lived peoples in the world? Are they the poor? Not necessarily, although poverty can be a clear driver of ill-health. The shortest-lived people in the world are people who live in the places of greatest social dislocation. Or, people who have had their societies stripped apart, with massive resultant stress. Australian aboriginals, NZ Maoris, North American aboriginals, the Inuit.
    ‘Indigenous Australians have the worst life expectancy rates of any indigenous population in the world, a United Nations report says. But it’s not news to Aboriginal health experts. They say it simply confirms what Australian health services have known for years.

    Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance of the Northern Territory (AMSANT) chief executive officer John Paterson said the findings of the report, which examined the indigenous populations of 90 countries, were no surprise. The UN report – State of the World’s Indigenous Peoples – showed indigenous people in Australia and Nepal fared the worst, dying up to 20 years earlier than their non-indigenous counterparts. In Guatemala, the life expectancy gap is 13 years and in New Zealand it is 11.’

    I continue to find it absolutely amazing that mainstream medical thinking casually dismisses mental ‘stress’ as a cause of anything, other than mental health. The connection is always dismissed in the following way.

    People who are depressed, anxious, suffering from PTSD and suchlike are more likely to drink and smoke and participate in other unhealthy lifestyles, and it is this that causes their higher rate of CVD and reduced life expectancy, and suchlike. There is a degree of truth to this, but some researchers have looked at this issue and found that the ‘unhealthy lifestyle’ issue explains very little.

    Underlying such an explanation, it has been noted that financial worries can increase your risk of heart disease by thirteen-fold (relative risk). Many of the arguments about CVD currently rage around diet, with people battling about HFLC vs LFHC, [high fat low carb vs low fat high carb].
    In all the dietary studies I have seen, we are talking about increased, or reduced, risks in the order of 1.12, or 0.89. Which means a twelve per cent increased risk, or an eleven per cent reduced risk. These figures may just reach statistical significance, but they are so small as to be, to all intents and purposes, completely irrelevant.

    On the other hand, a thirteen-fold increase in risk can be written another way. This is a 1,300% increase in risk. Compare this to anything to do with diet, or raised cholesterol, or blood pressure, or blood sugar or – any of the other mainstream risk factors. It is like comparing Mount Everest to a mole hill.

    Yet, and yet, attempting to divert attention, and discussion, away from diet, or cholesterol, or sub-fractions of cholesterol, or suchlike seems an impossible task. People may say that they cannot see how stress can cause CVD. To which I say, every single step has been worked out, many times, by many different people.

    Chronic stress → dysfunction of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis (HPA-axis) → sympathetic overdrive + raised stress hormones → metabolic syndrome (raised BP, raised blood sugar, raised clotting factors, raised cortisol, raised all sorts of things) → endothelial damage + increased blood clotting → plaque formation and death from acute clot formation.

    And if you want to close this loop further, stress also increases LDL levels, in some studies by over 60%5. So, when you see raised LDL, in association with increased CVD, it is not the LDL causing the CVD. It is stress, causing both.

    All words above are Dr Kendrick's, please see his article and full relevant links here
    https://drmalcolmkendrick.org/2017/12/09/what-causes-heart-disease-part-xlii-forty-two/

    All the best Jan
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    Re: Malcolm Kendrick

    Post by chris c on Tue Dec 12 2017, 22:32

    Oh good grief! I only just finished catching up on the comments on his previous post.

    All fascinating stuff though, his is probably the busiest blog currently out there, well on my reading list anyway.
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    Re: Malcolm Kendrick

    Post by Jan1 on Fri Dec 29 2017, 18:44

    Well I hope Dr Kendrick and his family had a good Christmas.
    He's been busy getting the next part of What Causes Heart Disease Ready - and here it is!

    What causes heart disease part 43

    29th December 2017

    What is stress?
    I have talked about stress quite a lot, but as many people have pointed out, the word itself is meaningless. Or perhaps it would be more accurate to say that is has too many meanings, or that it means different things to different people.

    Paul Rosch, a very brilliant man1, told me that when he was first looking at stress soon after the Second World War, he was working with Hans Sayle, a Hungarian. Sayle often commented that, had he understood English better, he would have used the word strain, not stress. He fully understood that ‘stress’ is the thing that creates ‘strain’ on the body. It is strain that matters, not the stress.
    This, I think, is absolutely critical. You can look at some people’s lives and they may seem highly ‘stressful’, whereas others appear to be relaxed, and avoiding stresses wherever possible. However, you have no idea at all who is under the greater strain.

    I remember a cardiologist, many years ago, pointing to an elderly woman who had just had a heart attack. ‘She lives in an idyllic cottage in the middle of the country, married, with loving children. No stress at all. So, don’t tell me stress causes heart disease.’ I merely shrugged. How could the cardiologist possibly know what was going on under the surface?

    Continue reading here
    https://drmalcolmkendrick.org/2017/12/29/what-causes-heart-disease-part-43/

    All the best Jan

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    Re: Malcolm Kendrick

    Post by Long birder on Fri Dec 29 2017, 20:08

    @Jan1 wrote:Well I hope Dr Kendrick and his family had a good Christmas.
    He's been busy getting the next part of What Causes Heart Disease Ready - and here it is!

    What causes heart disease part 43

    29th December 2017

    What is stress?
    I have talked about stress quite a lot, but as many people have pointed out, the word itself is meaningless. Or perhaps it would be more accurate to say that is has too many meanings, or that it means different things to different people.

    Paul Rosch, a very brilliant man1, told me that when he was first looking at stress soon after the Second World War, he was working with Hans Sayle, a Hungarian. Sayle often commented that, had he understood English better, he would have used the word strain, not stress. He fully understood that ‘stress’ is the thing that creates ‘strain’ on the body. It is strain that matters, not the stress.
    This, I think, is absolutely critical. You can look at some people’s lives and they may seem highly ‘stressful’, whereas others appear to be relaxed, and avoiding stresses wherever possible. However, you have no idea at all who is under the greater strain.

    I remember a cardiologist, many years ago, pointing to an elderly woman who had just had a heart attack. ‘She lives in an idyllic cottage in the middle of the country, married, with loving children. No stress at all. So, don’t tell me stress causes heart disease.’ I merely shrugged. How could the cardiologist possibly know what was going on under the surface?

    Continue reading here
    https://drmalcolmkendrick.org/2017/12/29/what-causes-heart-disease-part-43/

    All the best Jan

    Thanks Jan, I found that really interesting.
    regards
    Derek
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    Re: Malcolm Kendrick

    Post by Jan1 on Tue Mar 13 2018, 12:10

    Can you believe the good Doctor is up to Part 47 !

    "What causes heart disease part forty-seven

    13th March 2018

    Before putting cardiovascular disease to bed for a while and talking about other things – such as diabetes – I thought I should highlight a fact that is almost never remarked upon yet is extremely important. At least it is, if you trying to bring down the cholesterol hypothesis. The fact is this. A raised cholesterol level, or LDL level, is not a risk factor for stroke. Not even in familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) is a raised cholesterol level a risk factor for stroke.

    Here, I am quoting from a study published in the Lancet called ‘Cholesterol, diastolic blood pressure, and stroke: 13,000 strokes in 450,000 people in 45 prospective cohorts. Prospective studies collaboration.’

    ‘After standardization for age, there was no association between blood cholesterol and stroke except, perhaps, in those under 45 years of age when screened. This lack of association was not influenced by adjustment for sex, diastolic blood pressure, history of coronary disease, or ethnicity (Asian or non-Asian).’ 1

    I think that this was a big enough study to demonstrate that, if there is any effect, it can only be tiny. Yes, the study is over twenty years old, but it was done before statins came along to distort the entire area. By which I mean after the mid-nineties, a large number of people with raised cholesterol were being put on statins, thus making any interpretation of the impact of different cholesterol levels, on stroke, almost impossible.

    As for Familial Hypercholesterolaemia. The findings of the Simon Broome registry (set up in the UK to study the health impact of FH) were, as follows" ...

    Carry on reading here
    https://drmalcolmkendrick.org/2018/03/13/what-causes-heart-disease-part-forty-seven/

    All the best Jan
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    Re: Malcolm Kendrick

    Post by Jan1 on Sun Mar 25 2018, 14:10

    I just wonder do you think Part 52 will be the last chapter? We'll have to wait and see!

    But for those who may have been following Dr Kendrik's posts on What Causes Heart Disease here is Chapter 48

    " A year ago, I wrote a blog suggesting that lead – as in the element – could have caused/causes a great deal of cardiovascular disease. I went further, to propose that the removal of lead as an additive in petrol (gasoline) may have been responsible for a significant percentage of the decline in cardiovascular disease in the Western World, over the last forty or fifty years.

    Last week a paper was published suggesting that excess lead was responsible for as many deaths as smoking 1. So, there you go, it turns out I was right. Once again. Yes, yes, I know, Nobel prize on the way. Or perhaps not."

    Full article here
    https://drmalcolmkendrick.org/2018/03/22/what-causes-heart-disease-part-forty-eight-48/

    All the best Jan
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    Re: Malcolm Kendrick

    Post by Jan1 on Sat Jun 16 2018, 16:35

    Dr Malcolm Kendrick has recently posted this on his blog.

    "What causes heart disease? – part 49 (nearly there)"

    If you are interested there is lots to read here
    https://drmalcolmkendrick.org/2018/06/15/what-causes-heart-disease-part-47-nearly-there/

    All the best Jan
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    Re: Malcolm Kendrick

    Post by yoly on Sat Jun 16 2018, 19:58

    About his hypothesis of endothelial damage. Something that he doesn't mention much but I think is the big elephant in the room, is the reduction of collagen production that comes with ageing. That has to be a big factor as to why all the other causing damaging agents, get worse and risk increase with age.
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    Re: Malcolm Kendrick

    Post by chris c on Mon Jun 18 2018, 22:52

    Good point! I have to admit his theories make a lot more sense than "fat goes into the blood and gets plastered onto the arteries just like it blocks the drain". Well try putting oatmeal down the sink then ask yourself why eating that doesn't get plastered onto your arteries. Oh wait, animals of course. It's noticeable that about the only people left supporting Ancel Keys and "cholesterol" are the Militant Vegans.

    Yes the whole series of posts has been an eye-opener.

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    Re: Malcolm Kendrick

    Post by Long birder on Wed Jun 20 2018, 13:37

    The vegans need another ice age.
    It would sort them out!
    They probably would start eating each other rather than having the odd reindeer.
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    Re: Malcolm Kendrick

    Post by chris c on Wed Jun 20 2018, 23:06

    Thinking about it further, all of the "diseases of civilisation" can be looked at as premature ageing.
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    Re: Malcolm Kendrick

    Post by Jan1 on Tue Jul 24 2018, 19:01

    What causes heart disease – part fifty

    23rd July 2018

    Trying to work out what causes any disease is tricky, very tricky, although in some cases it has been relatively straightforward – at least in retrospect. Scurvy, for example, has a single cause. A lack of vitamin C. If you replace the vitamin C, all the signs and symptoms of scurvy will disappear.

    Equally, tuberculosis, is caused by the single pathogen, or microorganism, the tuberculous bacillus. The discovery of the bacillus was made by Robert Koch in 1882 using his meticulous scientific technique, based on his famous postulates:

    The microorganism must be found in abundance in all organisms suffering from the disease but should not be found in healthy organisms.
    The microorganism must be isolated from a diseased organism and grown in pure culture.
    The cultured microorganism should cause disease when introduced into a healthy organism.
    The microorganism must be re-isolated from the inoculated, diseased experimental host and identified as being identical to the original specific causative agent.

    Koch didn’t just stumble across a bacteria in someone with TB and announce to the world that this was the cause of TB. He knew that if you look in any sample from diseased lungs, you will find hundreds of different bugs kicking about. Which of them is the true cause?

    To find out, you need to isolate one, find a culture where it can multiply, then stick it in another animal to see if it develops the same disease. You take that microorganism back out of the newly diseased animal and check it is the same bacteria that you isolated in the first place. Then, and only then, can you claim you found the causal agent.
    Good stuff, sounds complicated. In truth, that was simple.

    Things become far more difficult when, for example, you cannot find a single causal agent. Or you find that you have found a likely agent, but many people exposed to it do not get the disease. Or, you find that people who have not been exposed to your proposed causal agent can also get the same disease.

    Smoking, for example. You have a hypothesis that smoking causes lung cancer, but most people who smoke do not get lung cancer. Equally, many people who have never smoked can suffer from lung cancer. Given this, you could argue that it is not actually smoking that causes lung cancer, but something else. An argument used for decades by the tobacco industry to establish that smoking was perfectly healthy.

    Recognising these difficulties, in 1965 the English statistician Sir Austin Bradford Hill proposed a set of nine criteria, known as ‘Bradford Hills cannons of causation’. They were designed to provide a model for epidemiologic evidence of a causal relationship between a presumed cause and an observed effect. It was Hill and Richard Doll who demonstrated the connection between cigarette smoking and lung cancer. The list of the criteria, or cannons, is as follows:

    … and you can read more here
    https://drmalcolmkendrick.org/2018/07/23/what-causes-heart-disease-part-fifty/

    All the best Jan

    N.B. The good Doctor is already talking about part 51 Exclamation
    Plenty more reading to come Smile
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    Re: Malcolm Kendrick

    Post by Jan1 on Sun Aug 19 2018, 17:57

    Just in case you may have run out of things to read …
    Dr Malcolm Kendrick has recently published part 52 in 'What Causes Heart Disease'

    What causes heart disease part 52

    16th August 2018

    Having talked about the end, I shall now talk about the beginning of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Or, to be more precise, the beginning of atherosclerotic plaque development.

    The problem that I always had with the LDL/cholesterol hypothesis was that it relied on a mechanism of action that sounded reasonable – if you didn’t think about it in any great depth. However, once you started looking at it closely, it become more and more unlikely. Namely, the idea that it is possible for low density lipoprotein to simply “leak” into artery walls, triggering the development of atherosclerotic plaques.

    Whilst everyone, and I mean everyone (apart from about a hundred flat-earthers), confidently states that leakage of LDL in the artery wall is the first step in atherosclerotic plaque development, the pattern of atherosclerosis around the body is impossible to reconcile with this hypothesis.

    Lets just start with a short list of problems. It may not look short, but it is. Just don’t get me started on ‘oxidised LDL’ and LDL particle size, and inflammation, and suchlike:

    Please continue here
    https://drmalcolmkendrick.org/2018/08/16/what-causes-heart-disease-part-52/

    All the best Jan
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    Re: Malcolm Kendrick

    Post by chris c on Sun Aug 19 2018, 21:34

    Not sure this may not be his best post yet.
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    Re: Malcolm Kendrick

    Post by yoly on Wed Aug 22 2018, 15:47

    He has another one with diabetes as a contributing factor. I don't understand how he can still believe that diet has nothing to do with CVD. Just because saturated fats and cholesterol got blamed something that Dr Malcolm Kendrick doesn't believe in it does mean that diet has nothing to do. Maybe not the cause but a very important contributing factor. The body is a chemical factory and the biggest input is diet. I know he is not a health integral doctor, he just present a very good alternative to explain CVD.
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    Re: Malcolm Kendrick

    Post by Jan1 on Wed Aug 22 2018, 23:59

    "He has another one with diabetes as a contributing factor."

    Yes, I saw he is now up to Part 53

    What cause heart disease part 53 – diabetes
    https://drmalcolmkendrick.org/2018/08/21/what-cause-heart-disease-part-53-diabetes/

    All the best Jan

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