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    Guide To Carbs In Vegetables

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    Jan1
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    Guide To Carbs In Vegetables

    Post by Jan1 on Sun Apr 09 2017, 13:13


    If you’re going low carb, The Ultimate Guide To Carbs In Vegetables will guide you in choosing which vegetables are best to incorporate in your diet.
    Each value is the net carbs per 100g using chronometer.com  Net carbs is the total carb value, minus the fibre.

    Vegetables are definitely the healthier (and better choice) when preparing meals.
    However, it must be noted that the different types of vegetables have different nutritional values.

    Please read lots more, with relevant links, at Ditch The Carbs Site here
    http://www.ditchthecarbs.com/2017/03/14/carbs-in-vegetables/

    All the best Jan
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    chris c
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    Re: Guide To Carbs In Vegetables

    Post by chris c on Mon Apr 10 2017, 00:01

    I'm a bit surprised at celery, and leeks, being so high. Also sweet potato being higher than ordinary potatoes, and on the other hand beet being so low. Makes me wonder if someone fudged the fibre numbers.

    I's also put swedes and Jerusalem artichokes somewhere between carrots and parsnips - though personally I find big carrots much easier to handle than the small ones. Also celeriac, probably a bit below carrots.
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    Re: Guide To Carbs In Vegetables

    Post by Jan1 on Mon Apr 10 2017, 12:21

    Hi Chris the celery is 1.5 ... not 15 Smile

    Leeks were surprising but they are a vegetable we enjoy. Just a small side dish cooked in double cream and you could add some garlic or grated cheese. I tend to judge my meals on Eddie's bg test meters ...

    Leeks also added to my fish pie, which is also cooked with double cream!

    Going back to the original article Libby states "Each value is the net carbs per 100g using chronometer.com  Net carbs is the total carb value, minus the fibre."

    I certainly hope the figures were correct, Libby ususally checks things out very thoroughly.

    All the best Jan

    PS Vegetables with our dinner tonight some Brussels Sprouts and Cabbage ... may do a few mushrooms as well, goes nicely with Chicken wrapped in bacon!
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    Re: Guide To Carbs In Vegetables

    Post by chris c on Thu Apr 13 2017, 22:23

    "Hi Chris the celery is 1.5 ... not 15"

    Ah OK, I'm overdue for an optician visit!

    There's obviously some individual variation, I can do some sweet potatoes/yams where I couldn't do ordinary spuds, and ISTR a few years back some low carb (salad) potatoes were introduced, but they were low yielding and hard to grow so I don't think many farmers did them. They also tasted like soap which didn't help any.
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    Re: Guide To Carbs In Vegetables

    Post by Jan1 on Sun Apr 16 2017, 11:28

    Isn't Spinach a great vegetable, served with fish it's a winner!

    "Spinach is believed to be of Persian origin. By the 12th century, it spread across Europe and became a desirable leafy green known for good health; a reputation that stands firm to this day.

    It is available all year round but is in season during the spring (March - June). It is well known for its nutritional qualities and has always been regarded as a plant with remarkable abilities to restore energy, increase vitality and improve the quality of the blood. There are sound reasons why spinach would produce such results, primarily the fact that it is rich in iron. Iron plays a central role in the function of red blood cells which help in transporting oxygen around the body, in energy production and DNA synthesis. Spinach is also an excellent source of vitamin K, vitamin A, vitamin C and folic acid as well as being a good source of manganese, magnesium, iron and vitamin B2. Vitamin K is important for maintaining bone health and it is difficult to find vegetables richer in vitamin K than spinach. Others include kale, broccoli and green cabbage."

    More here
    http://thelowcarbdiabetic.blogspot.co.uk/2015/04/the-health-benefits-of-spinach.html

    All the best Jan
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    Re: Guide To Carbs In Vegetables

    Post by chris c on Mon Apr 17 2017, 23:20

    Oh yes, and like frozen peas frozen spinach is IMO better than the "real thing". I always have some in the freezer and as you say it goes really well with fish, especially salmon. This week just for a change I had it with sea trout, but I think I prefer the salmon.

    Didn't know about the Persian connection, I assumed it was originally derived from sea beet or some similar wild plant which is frankly too tough to consider eating.
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    Re: Guide To Carbs In Vegetables

    Post by Jan1 on Tue Apr 18 2017, 18:15

    I always think it a good idea to have some frozen vegetables readily available, they can come in so handy.

    A bit like herbs ...  fresh are great, but dried can be handy.

    All the best Jan
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    Re: Guide To Carbs In Vegetables

    Post by chris c on Fri Apr 21 2017, 21:32

    Yes I always have frozen peas and spinach. Broad beans too which reminds me I haven't eaten any of them for a long time. Come to that I haven't had the peas recently either, there's just been so much fresh stuff available. I actually prefer dried herbs as they keep better so I can keep things in stock I only use occasionally. Fresh cilantro/coriander leaves are good though. Used to rip them up and add them to various chicken and prawn curries and the like, but they are seasonal.

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