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    L-Arginine and Alzheimer's Disease

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    yoly
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    L-Arginine and Alzheimer's Disease

    Post by yoly on Tue Jan 03 2017, 09:11

    ( Not new but interesting article. Citrulline seem to be even more bioavailable and work better than arginine.)

    Complete article:

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2600464/

    L-Arginine and Alzheimer's Disease

    Abstract

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of dementia, is characterized by progressive neurodegeneration and loss of cognitive and memory functions. Although the exact causes of AD are still unclear, evidence suggests that atherosclerosis, redox stress, inflammation, neurotransmitter dysregulation, and impaired brain energy metabolism may all be associated with AD pathogenesis. Herein, we explore a possible role for L-arginine (L-arg) in AD, taking into consideration known functions for L-arg in atherosclerosis, redox stress and the inflammatory process, regulation of synaptic plasticity and neurogenesis, and modulation of glucose metabolism and insulin activity. L-arg, a precursor of nitric oxide and polyamine, exhibits multiple functions in human health and may play a prominent role in age-related degenerative diseases such as AD.
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    chris c
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    Re: L-Arginine and Alzheimer's Disease

    Post by chris c on Wed Jan 04 2017, 22:29

    Very interesting! Malcolm Kendrick has often discussed nitric oxide, and L-arginine in the context of arterial damage in CVD. Currently I'm trying to keep my NO up by catching some rays whenever the sun is out, which he also recommends. Next time I order supplements I'll add this to my order. If I remember. That was a joke, Alzheimers definitely isn't.
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    Derek
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    Re: L-Arginine and Alzheimer's Disease

    Post by Derek on Fri Jan 06 2017, 20:22

    Don't live near a main road! D
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    chris c
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    Re: L-Arginine and Alzheimer's Disease

    Post by chris c on Fri Jan 06 2017, 23:39

    Got that covered! Well we do get the occasional bus coming past on its way to the Big City (Norwich) but out the back, nothing but fields for miles.

    I still remember our first night here, twelve years ago, after I finally persuaded mother the traffic among many other things in Surrey had become ridiculous with traffic jams every evening in what used to be a tiny back lane. Sat at the dining table looking out the back window she said

    "There's a car!"

    then ten minutes later

    "There's another one!"

    It's still much the same.

    The lack of pollution is noticeable in how many more stars you can see, and this probably also improves the amount of sunshine that actually makes it onto your body.

    Didn't stop a neighbour's husband from getting Alzheimers though Sad
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    yoly
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    Re: L-Arginine and Alzheimer's Disease

    Post by yoly on Sun Jan 08 2017, 10:04

    Dr. Ignarro is a pharmacologist who has spent over 40 years as a research scientist. In 1998, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in medicine for his research into Nitric Oxide.

    http://www.drignarro.com/nitric-oxide-health-disease/

    Nitric Oxide in Health and Disease

    Nitric Oxide functions as a widespread signaling molecule throughout the body. Some of the roles or functions of NO include the following: (1) vasodilation to decrease blood pressure and improve organ blood flow, (2) prevent unwanted blood clotting and obstruction to blood flow in arteries, (3) anti-inflammatory action in arteries to maintain a healthy arterial inner lining without cholesterol plaque buildup, (4) promotes learning, memory and information recall in the brain, (5) aids in the digestive process by promoting movement of digested foods and regulating secretion of digestive hormones and enzymes, (6) regulates bladder function by allowing the bladder to expand and hold more urine, (7) promotes erectile function and sexual arousal in men and women, (Cool protects the skin against ionizing radiation from the sun. In addition, NO functions as a signaling molecule in concert with many other molecules and hormones in the body to maintain normal bodily functions.

    Many disorders and diseases are associated with a decline in NO production as we age. In some cases, it is known that the decrease in NO actually causes the disorder. More research in the future will likely show that lower NO levels causes many more disorders. A variety of lifestyle habits have a direct impact on NO levels and risk factors for disease. Here are some examples of the association between lower NO levels and disease states: (1) hypertension or high blood pressure, (2) stroke, (3) myocardial infarction or heart attack, (4) dementia such as Alzheimer’s disease, (5) irritable bowel and related disorders in the digestive tract, (6) urinary incontinence especially in elderly women, (7) erectile dysfunction including sexual arousal disorders in men and women. Decreased NO production places an individual at increased risk for disease. For example, poor eating habits and nutrition can lead to overweight and obesity, all of which cause a long-term decline in NO production and an accompanying increased risk for type-2 diabetes, stroke and heart attack. It is believed that such a decrease in NO production can also cause increased risk for dementia, erectile dysfunction and other disorders.

    Physical activity or exercise can promote both acute and chronic increases in NO production. Here’s how. As your heart pumps more blood through the arteries during exercise, the increased force of blood flow triggers the endothelial cells at the inner layer of arteries to produce more NO. The reason for this is that NO is a vasodilator and will greatly improve local blood flow to the exercising muscles, thereby delivering more oxygen and nutrients from the blood into the muscle cells. NO goes up every time you exercise to the level where your heart rate goes up by at least 10 or 20 beats/minute. You don’t have to run a marathon or bicycle up hill for hours to increase your NO production. Walking briskly, jogging slowly, climbing stairs, playing tennis, swimming will do the trick. This NO, which the body uses to improve exercise performance, is the same NO that provides profound health benefits over time. Therefore, the key is to exercise repetitively, that is, several times each week for a lifetime. This chronic increase in NO production is precisely the reason why “exercise is good for your health”.


    Who should take dietary supplements that increase nitric oxide?

    http://www.drignarro.com/take-dietary-supplements-increase-nitric-oxide/

    Let me attempt to make the case that everyone should take dietary supplements that boost nitric oxide (also known as NO). Life itself is an aging process. That is, you begin aging at birth. Your nitric oxide levels are highest at birth and then start to decline steadily as you age. The lifestyle you lead determines the rate of decline. A life long lifestyle of healthy dieting and physical activity is your insurance of maintaining healthy nitric oxide levels. On the other hand, poor habits of unhealthy nutrition and sedentary lifestyle will promote a much more rapid decline in nitric oxide levels. Therefore, it is prudent to lead a healthy lifestyle starting from a very young age. You can supplement your healthy lifestyle by consuming foods and nutritional supplements that are scientifically known to increase nitric oxide levels. Such foods include healthy protein and antioxidants such as colorful vegetables and fruit. Nutritional supplements include those containing specific amino acids and antioxidants. As explained in other sections of my website, the two most important amino acids are L-arginine and L-citrulline, which the body utilizes to produe nitric oxide. The product you take should also contain several antioxidants, which protect the newly formed nitric oxide against oxidative destruction.

    Everyone should take such nutritional supplements daily for a lifetime because of all the health benefits provided by nitric oxide.  Since NO declines appreciably with age, I suggest that men and women begin taking such nutritional supplements at a relatively young age, such as between 20 and 35 years of age.  The younger the better.  Having indicated that, it’s never too late to begin at any age because you will still enjoy the health benefits of nitric oxide at any age.  I recommend strongly that women take products to boost their nitric oxide, and they should begin many years prior to onset of menopause.  The reason for this pertains to the levels of estrogen in women, which decline sharply during and after menopause.  Estrogen is well known to stimulate the production of NO, and prior to the onset of menopause women produce more NO than do men of equivalent age.  Consequently, prior to menopause, women are more protected than are men of equivalent age against cardiovascular disease associated with low levels of NO, such as stroke and heart attack.  However, big changes occur in women after menopause.  The sharp decline in estrogen causes a simultaneous decline in NO production and thereby increases the risk for stroke and heart attack in women compared with men of equivalent age.  Therefore, I recommend that women begin boosting their nitric oxide levels between 20 and 35 years of age and continue to do so daily for a lifetime.
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    chris c
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    Re: L-Arginine and Alzheimer's Disease

    Post by chris c on Sun Jan 08 2017, 22:41

    Blimey! It's a floor wax! It's a dessert topping!

    Seriously, I knew some of that but not most of it. Pity so much time was wasted studying "cholesterol" when they could have been looking at NO instead.

    Thanks, Yoly!
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    yoly
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    Re: L-Arginine and Alzheimer's Disease

    Post by yoly on Mon Jan 09 2017, 10:36

    There is also Agmatine a metabolite of arginine that is used a lot by weightlifters that appear to work well and I think that is cheaper since it uses lower dosages.

    Agmatine ameliorates type 2 diabetes induced-Alzheimer's disease-like alterations in high-fat diet-fed mice via reactivation of blunted insulin signalling

    http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S002839081630483X

    Attenuation of insulin resistance in rats by agmatine: role of SREBP-1c, mTOR and GLUT-2
    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00210-015-1174-6

    Activation of imidazoline-I3 receptors ameliorates pancreatic damage

    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1440-1681.12441/full

    Agmatine activation of nitric oxide synthase in endothelial cells.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9010916

    Agmatine, a metabolite of arginine, improves learning and memory in streptozotocin-induced Alzheimer’s disease model in rats

    http://www.scopemed.org/?jft=24&ft=24-1479197539
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    chris c
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    Re: L-Arginine and Alzheimer's Disease

    Post by chris c on Mon Jan 09 2017, 23:25

    Thanks, hadn't heard of that one at all.

    I'm trying to catch as many rays as I can, especially in winter. Even if it doesn't help it feels like it does.

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