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    Some diabetes drugs could promote the release of sugars into the blood

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    graham64
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    Some diabetes drugs could promote the release of sugars into the blood

    Post by graham64 on Wed Dec 14 2016, 22:33

    Study Highlights Possible Knowledge Gap over Effects of some Diabetes Drugs

    Scientists have found that some drugs from a group of anti-diabetic treatments may, in certain circumstances, act on glucagon receptors in the body, meaning that they could also potentially enable the release of sugar into the bloodstream.

    A gap in scientific knowledge about a family of drugs that are used to treat Type 2 diabetes has been highlighted in a new study.

    Researchers behind the study say that while their results are speculative at this stage, they point to a lack of complete information about the potential impact of a group of treatments known as GLP-1 agonists, or incretin mimetics.

    In particular, their survey found that one such treatment has the hitherto unrecognised potential to activate receptor sites for the hormone, glucagon. This can promote the release of sugars into the blood, which is a process that GLP-1 agonists are supposed to prevent.

    The paper, which is published in The Journal Of Biological Chemistry, stresses that these are only initial findings, and that more in-depth research will be needed before “definitive conclusions can be drawn” about the existing results.

    The researchers also say that there is no evidence that existing GLP-1 agonists are in any way dangerous for patients, but they do call for a more comprehensive approach to testing new drugs of this type, before they are released on to the market.

    The work was carried out by a team of researchers, led by academics from the University of Cambridge and the University of Warwick. Dr Graham Ladds, from the Department of Pharmacology and St John’s College, University of Cambridge, said: “What we have shown is that we need a more complete understanding of how anti-diabetic drugs interact with receptors in different parts of our bodies.”

    More here: http://www.otjonline.com/news2016/12/news14a.php


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    chris c
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    Re: Some diabetes drugs could promote the release of sugars into the blood

    Post by chris c on Fri Dec 16 2016, 18:18

    Now that's interesting!

    Since Byetta & co. were invented and I read a bit about incretins I pondered whether the fact I have (probably) never had a proper Phase 1 insulin response but still have pretty decent Phase 2 (a pattern in a small but significant number of others, only about half who went on to develop diagnosed diabetes while the rest remained "prediabetic" like me) might be a problem with incretins failing to switch on the beta cells.

    Roger Unger among others has done work looking at the effects of the alpha cells churning out glucagon in diabetics, and he (or someone) hypothesised that insulin resistance between the beta cells and alpha cells prevents the insulin rise from shutting off glucagon.

    Now if the same drug is basically pressing the accelerator and the brake at the same time, this adds another level of complexity.
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    yoly
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    Re: Some diabetes drugs could promote the release of sugars into the blood

    Post by yoly on Sat Dec 17 2016, 11:13

    Since insulin and glucagon are secreted together in response to high glucose and amino acids(some produce more glucagon that insulin response) it should not be strange that drugs that increase insulin secretion should also increase glucagon. The important thing is the ratio it produce of insulin to glucagon and if the insulin increase in the particular diabetic patient is capable of still suppressing the glucagon response in the liver. Otherwise it just will make thinks worst. Also the body has counter regulations that can affect blood glucose like the SGLT2 drugs that cause increase in glucagon as a response to losing glucose by the kidneys. Human are complicated and diabetes is a bitch.
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    Derek
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    Re: Some diabetes drugs could promote the release of sugars into the blood

    Post by Derek on Sat Dec 17 2016, 16:46

    Hi,
    The science behind these drugs seems to be a bit "suck it and see"!  Since there is now another paradigm for insulin resistance that has disarded the lock and key idea and has the cells already stuffed with blood glucose, one wonders where we are going, it seems to fit a drug releasing blood glucose when it should be dropping BG.

    I wonder Chris, if we, who apparently do not have a biphase insulin response, had a very little shot of insulin before we eat would it stop the RH roller coaster?
    Derek
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    chris c
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    Re: Some diabetes drugs could promote the release of sugars into the blood

    Post by chris c on Sat Dec 17 2016, 20:34

    Yes I asked that very question of Jenny (Janet Ruhl) long long ago, it's what she ended up doing to deal with her MODY.

    However try to find a doctor in the UK who would consider insulin as anything other than a drug of last resort.

    Interesting paper quoted by Gretchen Becker

    http://wildlyfluctuating.blogspot.co.uk/2016/11/restoring-insulin-secretion.html


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