The Low Carb Diabetic

Promoting a low carb high fat lifestyle for the safe control of diabetes. Eat whole fresh food, more drugs are not the answer.


Welcome to the Low Carb Diabetic forum,have you signed up yet? if not then sign up and join us in the low carb community today!

    Birds

    Share

    Long birder
    Member

    Status :
    Online
    Offline

    Posts : 172
    Join date : 2017-08-01

    Re: Birds

    Post by Long birder on Fri Oct 26 2018, 20:54

    Not seen a Lesser Yellowlegs this side of the Pond but seen plenty in Florida and Texas.
    They was a Greater Yellowlegs on the Eden estuary some twenty years ago which stayed for several weeks.

    Yellow legged gulls not regular up here. It is definitely a special interest for these guys who spend hours at rubbish tips and know intimately all the plumages and ages. Gulls are something to get into in big way.
    avatar
    chris c
    Member

    Status :
    Online
    Offline

    Posts : 4448
    Join date : 2015-07-26

    Re: Birds

    Post by chris c on Sun Oct 28 2018, 21:34

    I suggested to one of the wardens at Minsmere that they should bar-code the gulls so we'd know what we were looking at (he is one of the experts especially on picking Caspian Gulls out of the flocks of ordinary Herrings). Our local pig fields are where the specialists go.

    Today I spotted a small flock of Lapwings on the farmland, strangely among Woodpigeons rather than the usual gulls. Not many yet, and so far no Golden Plovers.

    I managed a brief scurry in between the rain showers, the sun was out but the wind was biting. There was a delightfully musical flock of about 50 Linnets perching in and circling around the treetops and plunging down to the ground, and I think I heard but failed to see a Chiffchaff lurking in a hedge. Not a lot else, some Goldfinches, Dunnocks and Robins, and a fair flock of House Sparrows on the roadside, probably where a truck had spilled grain.

    Oh well, the temperature sensor in the car has been down to single figures for the first time in ages - 8 C before the wind chill - so a good excuse to get myself outside of some Gloucester Old Spot sausages, broccoli, thickly buttered oatcakes and Cab Sauv. I just spotted a turkey, but it was cooked so I had some of that too.

    Long birder
    Member

    Status :
    Online
    Offline

    Posts : 172
    Join date : 2017-08-01

    Re: Birds

    Post by Long birder on Mon Oct 29 2018, 19:56

    You remind me of the geologist Richard Fortey, Chris!
    He would talk about creatures that existed in the last five hundred million years on Tele and then would dine on it nearest living relative.

    The RSPB reserve on the Solway has a terrible problem with rats at its feeders and they can't do anything unless they get permission from their ecologist first!

    Barmy, I would do what I did with the rat coming to my feeders.  
    I borrowed my neighbours .22 air rifle with a telescopic sight and got it in one, by resting the rifle on the top of a tripod and shot it from inside the patio with door about a foot open.
    I borrowed six pellets and took him five back.

    What next, vegans will be saying we can't kill rats.
    D.
    avatar
    chris c
    Member

    Status :
    Online
    Offline

    Posts : 4448
    Join date : 2015-07-26

    Re: Birds

    Post by chris c on Tue Oct 30 2018, 23:47

    Only if you eat them!

    Don't talk to me about rats! They used to come into the gardens during the harvest and cultivations in the back field, then go out again. When a neighbour had chickens they became semi-permanent. My neighbour, who is actually a pest controller, was convinced they were actually living under my decking, so I took it out. What he didn't know was that there was a layer of fabric (I can't remember the proper name for it) over the soil, and the rats were staying on top of the fabric and eating the birdseed but not going under it. Worse, I discovered that the buggers were coming through the fence from under his patio but he wouldn't have it.

    One year they dug out the mole runs and were popping up under my seed feeder from what used to be a molehill. After the mild winters a few years back I had to stop feeding the birds altogether.

    People used to take their kids down what was popularly known as Duck Lane but the rats got so bad in town that the council put up notices asking us not to feed the ducks because of the rats eating the bread and grain.

    At Minsmere a few years back there were not only foxes but badgers going on the "scrape" and eating the eggs and chicks. They surrounded it with an electric fence, so far so good. The other culprits which especially affect the Avocets are the numerous gulls. We used to have some decent breeding colonies of Little Terns on the beaches but it was mainly dogs and disturbance that did for them.

    Once people get involved changing things over here, other things change over there.

    No birds were damaged today, a rump steak with purple sprouting broccoli and some cods roe with spinach. Not so many birds seen either, just the usual gull species on the fields along with Rooks and Jackdaws, and of course the Woodpigeons. Fat bastards, they seem to have had a disappointingly good breeding season.

    I am reliably informed Pheasants and maybe Red Legged Partridges should be available from next week, there are masses of them too.
    avatar
    Jan1
    Member

    Status :
    Online
    Offline

    Female Posts : 4889
    Join date : 2014-08-13

    Re: Birds

    Post by Jan1 on Sun Nov 04 2018, 18:47

    Yes, I definitely have a soft spot for robins LOL!

    Sitting having a mid-morning cuppa, I spotted a robin sitting quite high up on a nearby tree.
    Would have made a lovely photograph - alas no camera handy.

    All the best Jan
    avatar
    chris c
    Member

    Status :
    Online
    Offline

    Posts : 4448
    Join date : 2015-07-26

    Re: Birds

    Post by chris c on Sun Nov 04 2018, 22:19

    Seen a few Robins about, mostly lurking. Seen and heard a few more Fieldfares and Redwings, but not as many yet as in some previous years. Also some small flocks of Starlings, presumably continental or Scandinavian. A few Black-Billed Blackbirds too - the genuine article, matt black rather than glossy, relatively paranoid of people and with an extra flourish when they land. Mostly in berry trees and bushes which used to be occupied and defended by Mistle Thrushes, but not so many of them nowadays.

    I had a British Black-Billed Blackbird a few years back - it was a youngster from one of the garden nests and kept its black bill into the following spring after it moulted, but it was standard glossy black and very tame, almost came to land on me for mealworms. Someone I was talking to reckoned they have become more widespread, I don't know if they are a cross between the British and continental ones.

    Lovely description of a Blackbird from an amazing book - The Peregrine by J A Baker, who used to follow them obsessively on the Essex estuaries in winter - "like a mad puritan with a banana in his mouth"
    avatar
    graham64
    Member

    Status :
    Online
    Offline

    Male Posts : 3700
    Join date : 2014-08-10
    Location : Lancs

    Re: Birds

    Post by graham64 on Tue Nov 06 2018, 21:19

    It's been a strange year seen very few blackbirds in the spring and summer unlike previous years but now they are back, the hawthorn hedge has been alive with them today just hope they stick around for spring next year


    _________________
    I'm a skinny T2 diagnosed 4/4/2008, a high calorie LCHF diet and one metformin a day A1c 6.2 and no complications.

    Proving the LowCarb sceptics wrong for over ten years

    Not all cherubs are Angels  Wink nor all diabetics Bonkers  Rolling Eyes
    avatar
    chris c
    Member

    Status :
    Online
    Offline

    Posts : 4448
    Join date : 2015-07-26

    Re: Birds

    Post by chris c on Tue Nov 06 2018, 22:26

    Ours bred OK but quickly vanished, I suspect into the Sparrowhawks. Yes it's a good berry season, lots of Woodpigeons in the Hawthorns and Ivy eating the berries, and when a train went past it scared out a Pheasant which was also up in a hawthorn bush.

    Blackbirds are starting to make more noise before going to roost and some of the Robins have restarted singing. The Rooks and Jackdaws put on a good display over the back field as the sun went down, before adjourning to the wood where they roost.

    Long birder
    Member

    Status :
    Online
    Offline

    Posts : 172
    Join date : 2017-08-01

    Re: Birds

    Post by Long birder on Thu Nov 08 2018, 15:46

    We have a very active and able Sparrow Hawk taking our feeding birds ATM. There are quite a lot of House Sparrows feeding as well as over 20 Tree Sparrows. The four Great Spotted woodpeckers are a pain, I hope the Sparrow Hawk thins them out a bit.
    D.
    avatar
    chris c
    Member

    Status :
    Online
    Offline

    Posts : 4448
    Join date : 2015-07-26

    Re: Birds

    Post by chris c on Thu Nov 08 2018, 23:45

    Haven't seen many Spars this year, especially not the local one, in fact I think I saw more Hobbies. They seem to have dropped from #1 spot a few years back and are now outnumbered by the Kestrels and Buzzards.

    Earlier I went for a rather disappointing walk over some different fields. There are lots of gnarly old oak trees, some of which are usually inhabited by Little Owls, but I saw and heard none, or the Barn Owls even though I stayed out until dusk. They were our commonest owl, Barn Owls second, Tawnies third but come to think I haven't seen or heard many of any of them since the Beast From The East. Short Eared Owls are coming in along the coast, mostly in winter but in the past I've seen them in most months. Long Eared Owls are occasionally reported but as masters of concealment not by me.

    No Lapwings let alone Golden Plovers, not even any Fieldfares or Redwings, or even Linnets. A small flock of about 8 Yellowhammers and about the same number of Bullfinches, and some tits mostly Long Tailed and Blue and a couple of Goldcrests. I saw a magnificent male Kestrel, later being chased by a Rook, and heard a distant Buzzard, and that was petty much it except for the regulation Rooks, Jackdaws, Gulls, Pheasants and Partridges.

    I walked round the lake that the farmer dug on top of the hill, but since he died there was naff all there either, it used to have a huge roost of Greylags in winter and Barnacles and various ducks and waders all year. Also he had a couple of Black Swans.

    Oh well, it was a nice walk as the sun went down, definitely a three sausage day (with PSB).

    Those Great Spotted Woodpeckers can be a pain, some years ago one hammered out the weld in my nut feeder and all the peanuts fell on the ground.Come to think, I haven't seen or heard as many of them as usual, though there are still some Green Woodpeckers to be found.
    avatar
    chris c
    Member

    Status :
    Online
    Offline

    Posts : 4448
    Join date : 2015-07-26

    Re: Birds

    Post by chris c Yesterday at 22:52

    Spotted a magnificent Red Kite over the farmland, right where I used to see them but hadn't in the last few years. Very likely they have been around all the time but have a large territory so were the other end of it from me.

    Also about a dozen Common Gulls with the regulation Blackheads and Herrings. Not uncommon in winter in dozens or maybe hundreds but nothing like the thousands a year or two back. Not much else over the fields, just the routine crows and Pheasants, and a covey of well over 30 Red Legged Partridges (yum!)

    Today I'm pretty sure I spotted a Merlin flash past, but I was driving and couldn't stop. Usually we get them on or near the coast but this was way inland. I'm sure it was too small and flew wrong for a Sparrowhawk. Gorgeous birds!

    Sponsored content

    Re: Birds

    Post by Sponsored content


      Current date/time is Thu Nov 15 2018, 16:55