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    Conger Eel

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    chris c
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    Conger Eel

    Post by chris c on Wed Mar 02 2016, 23:01

    Can't really recommend this one!

    Time was when jellied eels, and oysters, were pleb food. Now they are posh food. I'm partial to smoked eel occasionally but it's expensive and now the last eel catcher in the UK has retired early, they are imported from Holland, albeit still smoked here.

    The Man With The Fish Van often brings unusual things, and I was tempted by a fillet of conger eel, which I grilled and ate with toasted almonds and briefly boiled frozen spinach, and a couple of buttered oatcakes. 

    It didn't taste much different from any other white fish to be honest. The problem was that it was full of bones like hypodermic needles, and unlike normal fish where the bone is structured such that you can usually remove them complete, the bones in the eel were seemingly randomly scattered through the meat and had to come out one at a time. So the annoyance factor was high.
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    Jan1
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    Re: Conger Eel

    Post by Jan1 on Thu Mar 03 2016, 18:25

    chris c wrote:Can't really recommend this one!

    Time was when jellied eels, and oysters, were pleb food. Now they are posh food. I'm partial to smoked eel occasionally but it's expensive and now the last eel catcher in the UK has retired early, they are imported from Holland, albeit still smoked here.

    The Man With The Fish Van often brings unusual things, and I was tempted by a fillet of conger eel, which I grilled and ate with toasted almonds and briefly boiled frozen spinach, and a couple of buttered oatcakes. 

    It didn't taste much different from any other white fish to be honest. The problem was that it was full of bones like hypodermic needles, and unlike normal fish where the bone is structured such that you can usually remove them complete, the bones in the eel were seemingly randomly scattered through the meat and had to come out one at a time. So the annoyance factor was high.

    It's always nice to try different tastes - and I haven't tried conger eel!
    But I'm with you on this I do not enjoy fish with too many bones, the annoyance factor does get high Evil or Very Mad

    However, I did think this recipe sounded nice, but maybe substitute swede for potatoes?

    http://www.cookitsimply.com/recipe-0010-0k551.html

    Now it's Friday tomorrow - is anyone planning on eating fish?

    All the best Jan
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    Re: Conger Eel

    Post by chris c on Sun Mar 06 2016, 23:45

    I also bought some smoked haddock which I poached in water, slathered with butter and ate with toasted almonds and (frozen) spinach. Hardly any bones and they were in rows so easy to find.
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    Re: Conger Eel

    Post by Jan1 on Tue Mar 08 2016, 19:27

    chris c wrote:I also bought some smoked haddock which I poached in water, slathered with butter and ate with toasted almonds and (frozen) spinach. Hardly any bones and they were in rows so easy to find.

    That sounds good, and it reminds me of a Delia recipe, which is so similar ... ( in fact she may have got the idea from you  Exclamation )
    http://www.deliaonline.com/home

    Smoked Haddock with Creme Fraiche, Chive and Butter Sauce





    It's a great recipe,
    a) because it's the most wonderful combination of flavours, and
    b) because it takes only 12 minutes from start to finish.
    Serve it with spinach cooked in its own juices with a little butter, then drained well, and you'll have a sublime meal in no time at all.

    I think fish makes for a great dish  Smile

    But I still haven't tried conger eel !

    All the best Jan
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    Re: Conger Eel

    Post by chris c on Tue Mar 08 2016, 23:03

    Mother used to poach haddock in milk, then butter it. I prefer mine done in water.

    This week I have a bloater and some salmon. You can't beat fish, except for game and grass-fed meat!

    I had sea bream a while back, pretty much the nearest thing I could get to my ex-wife's delicious baked red snapper. The snapper has horrendous bones but at least they stay joined together and you can get the meat off with only the odd perforated finger.

      Current date/time is Tue Sep 26 2017, 20:54