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    British Dietetic Association publish diets they do not recommend.

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    Eddie
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    British Dietetic Association publish diets they do not recommend.

    Post by Eddie on Thu Dec 03 2015, 17:10

    The BDA issues what is arguably their most accomplished communiqué in years. An extract.

    Here are some of the worst reportedly celebrity-linked diets the BDA has identified and spoken out against in 2015:

    1.  No Sugar diet (last year’s number 3)

    Celebrity Link:  Tom Hanks and Alec Baldwin have reportedly followed this ‘diet’.

    What’s it all about?  The Sugar Free Diet is when you exclude all types of sugar (and often carbohydrates too) from your diet.

    BDA Verdict:  Not such a sweet deal! Confusion reigns. Cutting down on free sugars, reducing the amount of sugar you add, and consuming fewer products already containing added sugar, in addition to being label aware is definitely a positive. However, some versions of the No Sugar/Sugar Free Diet promote cutting out all sugar from your diet which is not only almost impossible, but would mean eliminating foods like vegetables, fruit, dairy products, nuts – leading to a less than healthy diet.  Also it is important to be aware of some substitutes these diet plans recommend like agave, palm sugar, maple syrup or honey, as these are actually just free sugars in another form and a huge contradiction. It’s not about a single food or nutrient, we advocate a whole diet approach.

    2. The all-kale and chewing gum diet

    Celebrity Link: Jake Gyllenhaal reportedly followed this ‘diet’ to shed weight for a film role.

    What’s it all about? There isn’t much to this one, as all you can eat is kale salad and chewing gum.

    BDA Verdict: Kale-amity! This diet is extreme, socially isolating, unbalanced, hard to sustain and potentially harmful. An actor would be carefully monitored and supervised to shed weight for a role. Many people get drawn in by so called ‘super foods’ but no one food can provide all the nutrients you need. These foods are not a magic bullet, neither does balanced nutrition work by a ‘good’ food cancelling out other poor dietary and lifestyle choices. Nothing is wrong with kale, but if that is all you consume all day, every day, then problems will arise - it’s all about balance, a healthy relationship with food (not obsession) and variety.

    3.   Bulletproof diet

    Celebrity Link:  Harry Styles and Shailene Woodley have reportedly followed this ‘diet’.

    What’s it all about?  This quirky diet plan includes a daily ‘Bulletproof coffee’ which is essentially a black coffee with 2 Tbsp butter,and a Tbsp MCT oil added totting up at around 400kcal per cup. Foods are classified as bulletproof, suspect or kryptonite with rules on timing of meals

    BDA Verdict: Un-bull-ieveable! Whilst the idea of minimising alcohol and processed food is positive, the classification of foods is at odds with health recommendations and lacks evidence. Time restricted eating is also at odds with many lifestyles. The negative of the recommended Bulletproof coffee is that consuming 400+ calories from one beverage provides a lot of energy but few nutrients from a drink, rather than individuals choosing food and drink with more nutritional content for the same calorie value.

    4.   The Super Elixir

    Celebrity Link: Elle McPherson is the co-founder and Creative Director of this product.

    What’s it all about? ‘The Super Elixir’ is a food supplement aiming to change body tissue from an acidic to an alkaline state. It comes in the form of a green powder and contains just over 45 ingredients including a number of powdered fruits and vegetables, sweeteners, several Chinese herbs and some digestive enzymes. The recommended dose is 2 teaspoons (or 10g) per day meaning a month’s supply could set you back £96 (£96 for 300g plus caddy/£62.50 for 300g pouch).

    BDA Verdict: How much?! The benefits that this costly powder claims to provide can easily be obtained from fruit and vegetables and a balanced diet, without the hefty price tag. Moreover our bodies are naturally capable of regulating acidity levels. Why not save between £750-£1152 per year, spend it on some delicious fruit and vegetables and a splurge on a ‘Super’ holiday instead!

    5.   Trim Secrets

    Celebrity Link:   Baroness Michelle Mone OBE, founder of lingerie brand Ultimo and life peer in the House of Lords, established Trim Secrets with a Scottish naturopath. Chanelle Hayes (former Big Brother star) has reportedly followed this ‘diet’.

    What’s it all about? Trim Secrets is a pill which claims to suppress appetite whilst boosting the metabolism, allegedly aiding both men and women to lose weight when combined with the Trim Secrets 5 stage diet plan. The diet plan includes a balanced diet of 1500 calories per day along with a Trim Secrets capsule taken three times a day before each meal, 1.5 litres of water daily, regular exercise and avoiding stress.

    BDA Verdict:  By consuming 1500 calories per day, most individuals should lose weight regardless of whether they are taking this pill, and that’s no secret. The pill has echoes of the grapefruit diet and includes guarana which is high in caffeine yet states its caffeine free. Beware of pills and potions and make sure you know exactly what you are buying and taking.

    Speaking about these and other fad diets, Sian Porter, consultant dietitian (That's the long time obese one) and Spokesperson for the BDA, said: (flogs spuds as a "Super Food" for the Potato Council and Margarine for the Fat Panel.

    “We hear it all when it comes to the latest way to shed pounds from the good to the bad, to the down-right dangerous!  When people need medical advice, they go to their GP and when people have a toothache, they go to their dentist, but some people will believe almost anything and anyone when it comes to nutrition, food and diet.
    “The bottom line is, if it sounds too good to be true, then it probably is. If you have to pay out for a DVD or book or product that will unlock the secrets of losing weight, this can be a good indicator that the only pounds you will be losing will be out of your wallet.  The simple fact is, there is no ‘wonder diet’ just as there are no ‘super foods’ and no one diet fits all.  What is super, is the way many marketing machines coin certain phrases to make you think there is some magic wand approach to losing weight.

    “Maybe it’s not as exciting but the truth is if you do want to lose some weight do it by eating a healthy, balanced diet that you can stick to, watch your portion sizes and be physically active. Think of it as a marathon approach to achieving your goals, as opposed to a sprint approach.  Aim to make permanent changes to your diet and lifestyle that are sustainable for you in the long term, not someone else’s lifestyle, nor abandoned by the end of January.”

    Link to BDA dross above here.

    https://www.bda.uk.com/news/view?id=94&x[0]=/news/list

    Note there are no super foods (my bold), but here she ranked potatoes as super foods.

    "Sian Porter, the Potato Council's consultant dietitian, told the Daily Express: 'It is important to have a wide variety of foods in your diet but sometimes our heads are turned by new things and we underestimate old favourites like potatoes and how they compare to other, often more expensive "superfoods".'

    Link to info http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2142256/The-ultimate-wonder-food-The-humble-potato-nutrients-vitamins-minerals-traditional-superfoods.html

    Jeez these people have zero memory it would appear, or is it they will say anything for money? I find myself asking does Sian follow the standard BDA advice? and if so, does she want us all to be over weight from eating too many spuds.


    _________________
    Type two diabetic-low carb diet (50 carbs per day) and two 500mg Metformin pills per day. Apart from diagnosis HbA1c almost 12-all HbA1c results none diabetic. For over eight years my diabetes medication has not changed. My weight has remained stable, I have suffered no ill effects from my diet whatsoever. Every blood test has proved, I took the right road to my diabetic salvation. For almost seven years, I have asked medical professionals and naysayers, how do I maintain non diabetic BG levels on two Metformin other than low carb ? The silence has been deafening !
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    chris c
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    Re: British Dietetic Association publish diets they do not recommend.

    Post by chris c on Thu Dec 03 2015, 21:22

    She wants us to eat what her sponsors tell her so we then have to be prescribed the drugs her other sponsors sell. If she makes us as fat as her we will have to eat more food and take more drugs and thus be more profitable, so she gets more commission.

    Next . . .


    Last edited by chris c on Fri Dec 04 2015, 22:47; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : typpo)
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    graham64
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    Re: British Dietetic Association publish diets they do not recommend.

    Post by graham64 on Thu Dec 03 2015, 22:53

    A high-fat, high-saturated fat diet decreases insulin sensitivity without changing intra-abdominal fat in weight-stable overweight and obese adults

    Abstract

    Purpose

    We sought to determine the effects of dietary fat on insulin sensitivity and whether changes in insulin sensitivity were explained by changes in abdominal fat distribution or very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) fatty acid composition.

    Methods

    Overweight/obese adults with normal glucose tolerance consumed a control diet (35 % fat/12 % saturated fat/47 % carbohydrate) for 10 days, followed by a 4-week low-fat diet (LFD, n = 10: 20 % fat/8 % saturated fat/62 % carbohydrate) or high-fat diet (HFD, n = 10: 55 % fat/25 % saturated fat/27 % carbohydrate). All foods and their eucaloric energy content were provided. Insulin sensitivity was measured by labeled hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps, abdominal fat distribution by MRI, and fasting VLDL fatty acids by gas chromatography.

    Results

    The rate of glucose disposal (Rd) during low- and high-dose insulin decreased on the HFD but remained unchanged on the LFD (Rd-low: LFD: 0.12 ± 0.11 vs. HFD: −0.37 ± 0.15 mmol/min, mean ± SE, p < 0.01; Rd-high: LFD: 0.11 ± 0.37 vs. HFD: −0.71 ± 0.26 mmol/min, p = 0.08). Hepatic insulin sensitivity did not change. Changes in subcutaneous fat were positively associated with changes in insulin sensitivity on the LFD (r = 0.78, p < 0.01) with a trend on the HFD (r = 0.60, p = 0.07), whereas there was no association with intra-abdominal fat. The LFD led to an increase in VLDL palmitic (16:0), stearic (18:0), and palmitoleic (16:1n7c) acids, while no changes were observed on the HFD. Changes in VLDL n-6 docosapentaenoic acid (22:5n6) were strongly associated with changes in insulin sensitivity on both diets (LFD: r = −0.77; p < 0.01; HFD: r = −0.71; p = 0.02).

    Conclusions

    A diet very high in fat and saturated fat adversely affects insulin sensitivity and thereby might contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes.

    Conclusions

    A diet very high in fat and saturated fat adversely affects insulin sensitivity and thereby might contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes.


    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00394-015-1108-6

    This study is being touted by BDA dietitians in their efforts to attempt to justify their objections to LC, desperation comes to mind seeing at 27% carbs it can't even be considered LC. Just how many people would be following a diet like this very few I would think which would not explain the increasing rates of obesity and diabetes.


    _________________
    I'm a skinny T2 diagnosed 4/4/2008, a high calorie LCHF diet and one metformin a day A1c 6.2 and no complications.

    Proving the LowCarb sceptics wrong for over nine years,

    Not all cherubs are Angels  Wink nor all diabetics Bonkers  Rolling Eyes
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    Angry of Leamington Spa
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    Re: British Dietetic Association publish diets they do not recommend.

    Post by Angry of Leamington Spa on Thu Dec 03 2015, 23:53

    This is just the sort of thing that makes my blood boil. I have some very good friends at the BDA and not all of them are morbidly obese. I find it sickening a bunch of Johnny come lately's start a bloody forum and think they know better. No wonder this country is going to the dogs. In my day many of you would have been horse whipped.
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    Paul1976
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    Re: British Dietetic Association publish diets they do not recommend.

    Post by Paul1976 on Fri Dec 04 2015, 00:06

    I do hope you're not too upset over this-Please don't phone the police or something too rash like that-We can work something out can't we? crying


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