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    New role for insulin: Studies tie the hormone to brain's 'pleasure' center

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    yoly
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    New role for insulin: Studies tie the hormone to brain's 'pleasure' center

    Post by yoly on Wed Oct 28 2015, 11:02

    (Why carbs are so addictive)

    Insulin, the hormone essential to all mammals for controlling blood sugar levels and a feeling of being full after eating, plays a much stronger role than previously known in regulating release of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that helps control the brain's reward and pleasure centers, new studies by researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center show.

    "We found that when there's more insulin in the brain, there will be more dopamine released, not less," says study senior investigator and NYU Langone neuroscientist Margaret Rice, PhD. Her team's new findings from laboratory and behavioral studies with rodents are set to appear in the journal Nature Communications online Oct. 27.

    Rice says the experiments she and her colleagues conducted not only reaffirm that insulin helps trigger the reuptake of dopamine when insulin levels rise, but also are the first to show that the net effect is a rise in dopamine levels. The results may also be the first to demonstrate that insulin's role in the dopamine pathway may affect and explain food choices.

    In one set of experiments, Rice and her colleagues recorded a 20 percent to 55 percent increase in dopamine released in the striatal region of the rodent brain (where dopamine's effects on the brain are felt and which governs the body's response to getting a reward). The rise occurred along the same timeframe as the rise in insulin activity needed to process any food sugars the mice and rats ate. And this occurred despite the reabsorption, or reuptake, of dopamine that in other regions of the brain tells an animal that its appetite is satisfied.

    Rice and study co-principal investigator Kenneth Carr, PhD, also conducted separate experiments with rats in which they found that animals fed low-calorie diets had a 10-fold greater sensitivity to increasing insulin levels in the brain (meaning that it took only a tenth of a rise in insulin levels as seen in rats on a normal diet to spur dopamine release). By contrast, rats on high-calorie diets lost all striatal-brain insulin responsiveness. In addition, rats offered a choice between a drink reward that was paired with either an insulin antibody injection to block hormone signaling or a mock placebo injection always favored the drink-injection combination that led to intact insulin signaling (and more dopamine).

    "Our work establishes what we believe is a new role for insulin as part of the brain's reward system and suggests that rodents, and presumably people, may choose to consume high-carb or low-fat meals that release more insulin -- all to heighten dopamine release," says Rice, a professor in the Department of Neurosurgery at NYU Langone and a member of NYU Langone's Druckenmiller Neuroscience Institute.

    Rice says this finding is important because chronically elevated insulin levels and lowered insulin sensitivity in the brain are closely tied to obesity and type II diabetes, both very prevalent in the United States.

    Rice says the team plans further experiments on how insulin influences the mammalian brain's control over food motivation and reward pathways, and whether changes in insulin sensitivity brought about by obesity can be reversed or even prevented.

    "If our future experiments prove successful," says Rice, "it could confirm our hypothesis that when people refer to an insulin-glucose rush, they may really be referring to a dopamine reward rush. And there are healthy ways to get that by making smart food choices."

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/10/151027074802.htm
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    chris c
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    Re: New role for insulin: Studies tie the hormone to brain's 'pleasure' center

    Post by chris c on Wed Oct 28 2015, 23:06

    Hahahaha that's one in the eye for Dr Stephan Guyenet PhD and his belief that insulin is nothing to do with obesity or "Food Reward"

    Full paper available here also as PDF, I'll be needing more coffee to read it.
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    Eddie
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    Re: New role for insulin: Studies tie the hormone to brain's 'pleasure' center

    Post by Eddie on Thu Oct 29 2015, 18:26

    chris c wrote:Hahahaha that's one in the eye for Dr Stephan Guyenet PhD and his belief that insulin is nothing to do with obesity or "Food Reward"

    Full paper available here also as PDF, I'll be needing more coffee to read it.

    Stephan Guyenet is out to lunch if he believes "insulin is nothing to do with obesity" Talk to type one diabetics and many say before diagnosis and injected insulin, their weight plummeted. Many diabetics state when they started injected insulin their weight went up big time. Check out the type one pics from the time before injected insulin was available, skeletal thin regardless of what they ate. No insulin no weight gain. Also, insulin is the ageing hormone, hence why insulin is not a get out of jail free card.


    _________________
    Type two diabetic-low carb diet (50 carbs per day) and two 500mg Metformin pills per day. Apart from diagnosis HbA1c almost 12-all HbA1c results none diabetic. For over eight years my diabetes medication has not changed. My weight has remained stable, I have suffered no ill effects from my diet whatsoever. Every blood test has proved, I took the right road to my diabetic salvation. For almost seven years, I have asked medical professionals and naysayers, how do I maintain non diabetic BG levels on two Metformin other than low carb ? The silence has been deafening !
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    chris c
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    Re: New role for insulin: Studies tie the hormone to brain's 'pleasure' center

    Post by chris c on Fri Oct 30 2015, 18:33

    I used to read his blog before he became a Professional Obesity Researcher - he used to write a fair bit of sense.

    Then he got sucked into something called Food Reward. He may genuinely believe his research was to benefit humanity but I have little doubt it was actually to benefit the Foodlike Substance Manufacturing Industry who would use any trick in the book to make "food" more addictive. Where did he think research grants come from?

    He got dissed by Gary Taubes at a big conference and set out to discredit him and insulin both. Even going so far as to delete a bunch of his old blog posts.

    Well now he can BEND DOWN AND SPREAD THEM! Insulin meets food reward. Do I want to see how he squirms out of this one? Life's too short, especially since Evil Lyn is one of his blog contributors.

      Current date/time is Mon Oct 23 2017, 10:47