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    Midday naps associated with reduced blood pressure and fewer medications

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    yoly
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    Midday naps associated with reduced blood pressure and fewer medications

    Post by yoly on Mon Aug 31 2015, 12:37

    London, UK – Midday naps are associated with reduced blood pressure levels and prescription of fewer antihypertensive medications, according to research presented at ESC Congress today by Dr Manolis Kallistratos, a cardiologist at Asklepieion Voula General Hospital in Athens, Greece.1

    “Although William Blake affirms that it is better to think in the morning, act at noon, eat in the evening and sleep at night, noon sleep seems to have beneficial effects,” said Dr Kallistratos. “Two influential UK Prime Ministers were supporters of the midday nap. Winston Churchill said that we must sleep sometime between lunch and dinner while Margaret Thatcher didn’t want to be disturbed at around 3:00 pm.  According to our study they were right because midday naps seem to lower blood pressure levels and may probably also decrease the number of required antihypertensive medications.”

    He added: “Μidday sleep is a habit that nowadays is almost a privileged due to a nine to five working culture and intense daily routine. However the real question regarding this habit is: is it only a custom or is it also beneficial?”

    The purpose of this prospective study was to assess the effect of midday sleep on blood pressure (BP) levels in hypertensive patients. The study included 386 middle aged patients (200 men and 186 women, average age 61.4 years) with arterial hypertension. The following measurements were performed in all patients: midday sleep time (in minutes), office BP, 24 hour ambulatory BP, pulse wave velocity,2 lifestyle habits, body mass index (BMI) and a complete echocardiographic evaluation including left atrial size.3 BP measurements were reported as diastolic and systolic BP.4

    After adjusting for other factors that could influence BP such as age, gender, BMI, smoking status, salt, alcohol, exercise and coffee, the researchers found that midday sleepers had 5% lower average 24 hour ambulatory systolic BP (6 mmHg) compared to patients who did not sleep at all midday. Their average systolic BP readings were 4% lower when they were awake (5 mmHg) and 6% lower while they slept at night (7 mmHg) than non-midday sleepers (Figure 1).

    Dr Kallistratos said: “Although the mean BP decrease seems low, it has to be mentioned that reductions as small as 2 mmHg in systolic blood pressure can reduce the risk of cardiovascular events by up to 10%.”

    The researchers also found that in midday sleepers pulse wave velocity levels were 11% lower and left atrium diameter was 5% smaller. “These findings suggest that midday sleepers have less damage from high blood pressure in their arteries and heart,” said Dr Kallistratos.

    The duration of midday sleep was associated with the burden of arterial hypertension. Patients who slept for 60 minutes midday had 4 mmHg lower average 24 hour systolic BP readings and a 2% higher dipping status5 compared to patients who did not sleep midday. Dippers had an average of 17 minutes more midday sleep than non-dippers.

    Dr Kallistratos said: “Our study shows that not only is midday sleep associated with lower blood pressure, but longer sleeps are even more beneficial. Midday sleepers had greater dips in blood pressure while sleeping at night which is associated with better health outcomes. We also found that hypertensive patients who slept at noon were under fewer antihypertensive medications compared to those who didn’t sleep midday.”

    He concluded: “We found that midday sleep is associated with lower 24 hour blood pressure, an enhanced fall of BP in night, and less damage to the arteries and the heart. The longer the midday sleep, the lower the systolic BP levels and probably fewer drugs needed to lower BP.”



    http://www.healthcanal.com/blood-heart-circulation/heart-disease/66374-midday-naps-associated-with-reduced-blood-pressure-and-fewer-medications.html




    ENDS


    References

    1Dr Kallistratos will present the abstract ‘Association of mid-day naps occurrence and duration with bp levels in hypertensive patients.  a prospective observational study’ during:
    •    The press conference ‘Lifestyle and Hypertension’ on Saturday 29 August at 13:00
    •    Poster session 1: Hypertension diagnosis and pathophysiology on Saturday 29 August at 11:00 in the Poster Area
    2Pulse wave velocity indicates arterial stiffness, which is a measure of the detrimental effects of hypertension and ageing in the arteries.
    3Left atrial size is a marker of deleterious heart adaptation to increased BP levels and a predictor of adverse events.
    4The bigger number of the two in the blood pressure (BP) measurement is the systolic BP and the lower number is diastolic BP.
    5Dipping status refers to the percentage of blood pressure drop during sleep at night.
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    Jan1
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    Re: Midday naps associated with reduced blood pressure and fewer medications

    Post by Jan1 on Mon Aug 31 2015, 16:04

    Interesting to read this and I'm sure many would love the opportunity of having an afternoon nap. Smile

    I did look up on Wiki the word siesta because in many of the warmer countries the people do enjoy a siesta. I noted that in 2007 this was said "The siesta habit has recently been associated with a 37 percent reduction in coronary mortality, possibly due to reduced cardiovascular stress mediated by daytime sleep (Naska et al., 2007)."

    Link to Wiki here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siesta

    All the best Jan
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    Sally
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    Re: Midday naps associated with reduced blood pressure and fewer medications

    Post by Sally on Mon Aug 31 2015, 16:31

    Perhaps it's not the mediterranean diet (whatever that is), but the mediterranean siesta, which in Greece at least is a period of rest and quiet between 3.00 and 5.00, that does the good.
    Sally
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    chris c
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    Re: Midday naps associated with reduced blood pressure and fewer medications

    Post by chris c on Mon Aug 31 2015, 20:57

    Would be interesting to look at BG and insulin levels before and after the nap also.

    Yes I think you may be onto something with the Siesta.
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    graham64
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    Re: Midday naps associated with reduced blood pressure and fewer medications

    Post by graham64 on Mon Aug 31 2015, 22:00

    I don't normally have a nap the exception being if I'm outside on a warm sunny day sunny on the lounger, I can easily drift off into the land of nod for a while 

    Having read this report I guess I'll have to make more of an effort to have a daily siesta Sleep


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    chris c
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    Re: Midday naps associated with reduced blood pressure and fewer medications

    Post by chris c on Tue Sep 01 2015, 21:34

    While my mother was alive I developed the habit of crashing out early evening after eating, then getting up again later when I could do stuff without being interrupted. Then I'd get up late, leaving the morning for her, and we'd do stuff in the afternoon after her bowels had calmed down (Crohn's disease) so I considered that a late siesta.

    Yesterday and today I had a genuine siesta due to the terminal dullness and rain. Tomorrow I have to get a bunch of things done so I probably won't. If I could be bothered I'd have done some BG testing to see what difference it made.

      Current date/time is Wed Aug 23 2017, 20:18