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    4 Foods Americans Don't Eat Much Anymore

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    graham64
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    4 Foods Americans Don't Eat Much Anymore

    Post by graham64 on Mon Aug 24 2015, 22:57

    Strange, isn't it, we remark to Sandra L. Oliver — founder and editor of Food History News — that Americans in the 19th century ate foods such as robins and calf's foot jelly and boiled eels.

    She cautions against criticism of previous generations or other cultures. "You are safer not talking 'strange' but rather, perhaps, neglected or abandoned eating habits," she says. "That would include almost any offal — that is, livers, spleen, kidneys, heart, brains, sweetbreads, et cetera."

    In fact, says Oliver, author of several books, including Food in Colonial and Federal America, Americans once feasted on fish heads. And folks in other parts of the world still do. But "we seldom eat boiled puddings — batters made from flour, sugar, suet, eggs, et cetera, boiled in a cloth," she says. "Most people don't like a gummy texture — we don't eat marrow very much, not at table. If we eat it, the chef has extracted it and included it."

    Like us, she says, "19th century Americans liked meat, potatoes and a side of vegetables with dessert to follow and bread and butter along with."

    But they did have some surprises in their cookbooks. Here are four:

    1) Robin Pie. Robins must have been popular on American tables in the 1800s. "The robins of the North have been driven South by the severity of the weather," reported the Pittsburgh Weekly Gazette on Feb. 8, 1868, "and the people of Pensacola are shooting and eating them."

    Here's a recipe from Wehman's Cook Book, published in 1890: "Cover the bottom of a pie-dish with thin slices of beef and fat bacon, over which lay ten or twelve robins, previously rolled in flour, stuffed as above, season with a teaspoonful of salt, a quarter ditto of pepper, one of chopped parsley, and one of chopped eschalots, lay a bay-leaf over, add a gill of broth, and cover with three quarters of a pound of half puff taste, bake one hour in a moderate oven, shake well to make the gravy in the pie form a kind of sauce, and serve quite hot."

    Today robins — and scores of other birds — are protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act

    2) Terrapin Stew. During the Gilded Age and some years after, one of the "nastiest and most difficult jobs" in the American kitchen — writes food historian Barbara Haber in her 2002 From Hardtack to Home Fries: An Uncommon History of American Cooks and Meals — was "preparing stewed terrapin, a mud turtle dish that was much in demand a hundred years ago but now has all but disappeared from the American table."

    She cites instructions from the 1902 volume, Mrs. Seely's Cook Book, to "select live female terrapins, cover them with boiling water, and cook for ten minutes. Remove from the fire, and when sufficiently cooked, scrape the skin and pull out the toe nails."

    Terrapin was an acquired taste and much enjoyed by Grover Cleveland and Franklin Roosevelt and members of private men's clubs around the country, Haber says. The dish has fallen out of favor because few folks are inclined to eat reptiles these days — and "would not know how to cook them even if they were."


    3) Calf's Foot Jelly.Though calf's foot jelly is not talked about much anymore in the nation's kitchens, Sandy Oliver says that many contemporary Americans are still eating variations of calf's foot jelly — whether they know it or not. "Gelatin comes from ligament-rich animal parts," she says, "a byproduct of slaughterhouses."

    Home Cookery: A Collection of Tried Receipts, Both Foreign and Domestic by Mrs. J. Chadwick, 1853, offered this recipe: "Boil four feet in one gallon of water till reduced to two quarts. Strain and let stand over night. Take off the fat and add to the jelly one pint of wine, the juice of four lemons, and the whites of eight eggs. Stir it well together and sweeten to your taste. Let it boil half an hour, then skim and put into a flannel bag to drain. Should it run through in a stream, it must be returned again and again, until it will pass the bag only in quick drops."


    4) Boiled Eels. From The American Home Cook Book: With Several Hundred Excellent Recipes by An American Lady, 1864, comes this method: "Use small ones; stew with plenty of parsley, in very little water. The parsley must be served as well. For sauce, use parsley chopped fine, and melted butter with it."

    Read more: http://www.npr.org/sections/npr-history-dept/2015/08/18/432334575/4-foods-americans-don-t-eat-much-anymore


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    Re: 4 Foods Americans Don't Eat Much Anymore

    Post by Jan1 on Tue Aug 25 2015, 11:34

    Interesting read ... and hopefully this isn't too off topic?
    Over the years eating habits, our choice of foods have seen a lot of changes. A blog I do read from time to time is 'The Old Foodie' it does provide an insight into food habits from some years ago.

    Blog is here  http://www.theoldfoodie.com/


    Take this for instance a snippet from Mrs Beeton in 1895 ... we always had Mrs Beeton's cook book in our house - my dear mum used to refer to it quite a lot. A thick and quite heavy book it was - must have been quite expensive, books are not cheap are they ... but it was my mums cooking bible.

    Of course cucumbers are still popular today and great if you can grow your own.

    Cucumbers, to Dress.
    Ingredients.- 3 tablespoonfuls of salad-oil, 4 tablespoonfuls of vinegar, salt and pepper to taste.
    Mode.- Pare the cucumber, cut it equally into very thin slices, and commence cutting from the thick end; if commenced at the stalk, the cucumber will most likely have an exceedingly bitter taste, far from agreeable. For the purpose of slicing cucumber evenly and very thin, we recommend the slice [image of a mandolin] in in preference to an ordinary knife. Put the slices into the dish, sprinkle over salt and pepper, and pour over oil and vinegar in the above proportion; turn the cucumber about, and it is ready to serve. This is a favourite accompaniment to boiled salmon, is a nice addition to all descriptions of salads, and makes a pretty garnish to lobster salad.
    Average cost, when scarce, 1s to 2s. 6d.; when cheapest, may be had for 1d. each.
    Seasonable. – Forced from the beginning of March to the end of June; in full season in July, August, and September.

    Mrs. Beeton’s Dictionary of Every-day Cookery (1865)

    All the best Jan
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    Re: 4 Foods Americans Don't Eat Much Anymore

    Post by chris c on Tue Aug 25 2015, 20:57

    My ex cooked a lot of dishes from different parts of the world. One of my favourites was a Caribbean thing with chicken in very hot sauce served with a starchy thing I can't damn well remember the name of, MORE chicken roasted in a jerk marinade, plantains, and a mix of vegetables and finely chopped VERY hot peppers like Scotch Bonnets.

    Apart from the starch and the plantains I could still demolish that today.

    About the only thing I couldn't eat was a West African kind of gumbo, including pig feet, lamb chops, okra, sesame seeds boiled for hours in a pressure cooker, and a green thing called kalalu, all in lashings of palm oil.

    I think the pig feet were the biggest turnoff, followed closely by the consistency of secondhand spittle, complete with bogies. But she loved it equally, along with pizza, spag bol, French and Italian dishes, and roast leg of lamb and veggies.

    She turned her nose up at my love of smoked eel though.

    I love prawns, shrimps and the like, and oysters cooked but not raw, but can't abide whelks. There was a time when oysters were a food of the poor. I could probably handle squirrel and hedgehog but probably not insects, and DEFINITELY not tripe.

    Yet I know a lot of people who wouldn't even consider liver or kidneys.
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    Re: 4 Foods Americans Don't Eat Much Anymore

    Post by graham64 on Tue Aug 25 2015, 21:32

    @chris c wrote:
    Yet I know a lot of people who wouldn't even consider liver or kidneys.


    Yes I no some people who would not touch offal, they don't know what their missing besides being highly nutritious it's also cheap.

    I did used to eat tripe Shocked cold seasoned with salt and vinegar but that was many years ago at my Grans.


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    Not all cherubs are Angels  Wink nor all diabetics Bonkers  Rolling Eyes
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    Re: 4 Foods Americans Don't Eat Much Anymore

    Post by Jan1 on Wed Aug 26 2015, 18:32

    Talking of liver - this is a super recipe and meal!


    Liver and bacon, mushroom, onion, carrot and courgette casserole served with white cabbage and mashed swede.

    A very tasty low carb, healthy meal. Total cost is less than £2.00 per person. With enough gravy and vegetables left over for a very tasty soup for two the next day. Very easy to prepare and cook. Whole fresh low carb good food does not have to be expensive.

    Cut up lambs liver into small chunks and place in casserole dish. Slice and chop a small red onion, put in casserole dish. Slice some courgette, carrot and mushrooms and put in casserole dish with the liver and onion. Scatter some mixed herbs over the ingredients and add seasoning. Make up approx pint gravy stock and pour over ingredients. Cover with lid and cook in the oven for about 90 mins at 190 degrees / Regulo 5. Every 30 minutes or so gently mix and turn the ingredients. Check food is thoroughly cooked and serve with some white cabbage and mashed buttery swede. A really tasty meal, just right for the Autumn / Winter months.

    All the best Jan

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    chris c
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    Re: 4 Foods Americans Don't Eat Much Anymore

    Post by chris c on Wed Aug 26 2015, 21:23

    @graham64 wrote:
    Yes I no some people who would not touch offal, they don't know what their missing besides being highly nutritious it's also cheap.

    Also cooks in no time flat.

    Haha, I just remembered when I cooked a meal she couldn't eat (and nor could I).

    I've always loved hot food like curries so vicious they make the inside of my nostrils sweat.

    I found some cute little chilles that looked just like miniature peppers, so I chopped up about three of them and added them to the curry I was making.

    Total disaster! It was so hot neither of us could handle it.

    When I admitted what I'd done she fell about laughing. When she used these chillies sh'ed put a whole one in the sauce and fish it out again and chuck it after a while. They were like Scotch Bonnets with a turbocharger.

    My old man hated curries but would happily eat horseradish until the top of his bald head began to steam. Not something I like at all.

    Mutton is something else we used to eat, that fell out of favour for decades and came back in again recently.
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    Re: 4 Foods Americans Don't Eat Much Anymore

    Post by chris c on Fri Aug 28 2015, 19:08

    I ate woodcock once (no no the BIRD) and snipe, and grouse. In France we ate horse.

    Gran used to be fond of mock turtle soup (which came in a can) and I'm pretty sure I ate real turtle soup in Majorca.

    In the nature reserve where I was earlier, someone reported a swan had got stuck in a sluice. My first thought was "I could eat that with my runner beans".

    A bit further down the path someone was photographing a Muntjac deer. My second thought was "I could eat *that* with runner beans".

    Is there something wrong with me, or is it them?
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    Re: 4 Foods Americans Don't Eat Much Anymore

    Post by Jan1 on Fri Aug 28 2015, 19:24

    Now Chris got me thinking ....

    Roast grouse with blackberries and salt-baked celeriac

    Try this autumnal pot-roast of grouse and juicy blackberries – and a novel way of cooking celeriac.

    Ingredients:

    For the salt-baked celeriac
    1 large celeriac, base sliced off, green top left on
    110g/4oz free-range egg whites (about three medium egg whites)
    700g/1lb 8oz table salt
    5 sprigs fresh rosemary, finely chopped
    110ml/4fl oz olive oil
    sea salt flakes, to taste
    freshly ground black pepper

    For the grouse:
    4 rashers smoked bacon
    2 fresh grouse
    1 tbsp olive oil
    4 shallots, peeled, thinly sliced
    1 garlic clove
    5 sprigs fresh thyme, leaves picked
    150g/5oz fresh blackberries
    150ml/5fl oz chicken stock, preferably homemade
    50g/2oz butter

    Preparation method
    For the celeriac, preheat the oven to 190C/350F/Gas 5.
    Place the celeriac into a roasting tray.
    Mix the egg whites, table salt and rosemary together in a large bowl until the mixture forms a paste.
    Cover the celeriac in a 2cm/¾in thick layer of the salt paste, ensuring there are no gaps. Bake in the oven for 45-50 minutes.
    Meanwhile, for the grouse, lay two rashers of smoked bacon over the fat part of each grouse breast. Tie the bacon to the birds using kitchen string.
    Heat the oil in a heavy-based flameproof casserole over a medium heat. Once the oil is hot, add the grouse and fry, turning regularly until browned on all sides. Remove from the pan and set aside.
    Add the shallots, garlic and thyme leaves to the same casserole and fry for 1-2 minutes, or until softened.
    Add the blackberries and chicken stock and place the grouse on top. Cover the casserole with the lid and cook in the oven for 10-12 minutes, or until the grouse are cooked through.
    Once cooked, remove the casserole from the oven and set aside for 10 minutes.
    Remove the birds from the casserole and set aside. Keep warm.
    Bring the remaining contents of the casserole to the boil on the hob. Reduce the heat until the mixture is simmering. Continue to simmer until the volume of liquid has reduced by half - about five minutes. Whisk in the butter until the gravy is glossy. Keep warm.
    When the salt-baked celeriac has cooked, remove it from the oven, chip away the salt crust and scoop out the baked celeriac into a bowl.
    Add a splash of olive oil to the celeriac, then season, to taste, with sea salt flakes and freshly ground black pepper. Mix the celeriac with a fork until combined.
    To serve, remove the string from the grouse, cut the breasts from the carcasses and cut any sinew from the breasts. Divide the salt-baked celeriac equally between two serving plates. Place one grouse breast on top of each portion of celeriac. Drizzle the gravy around the edge of the plates.

    Recipe idea from here http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/roast_grouse_with_09214

    I'm told it also goes well with RUNNER BEANS Smile

    All the best Jan
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    Re: 4 Foods Americans Don't Eat Much Anymore

    Post by chris c on Sat Aug 29 2015, 19:46

    Expensive but tasty, yes most game does best wrapped in bacon as it can be a tad low fat.

    I had some further memories, I'm pretty sure when I was young gran used to put a pot over the coal fire and make stew, before she got too old to haul the coal in and went electric.

    When I was at college we used to do the same thing - put a pan on a kind of swinging grate that went over the coal fire and stew up a load of root veggies, pearl barley, cabbage and small quantities of meat, simmered for a few hours, then what wasn't eaten was added to the following day. And the day after.

    Also I found the marrow spoons we used to use to dig marrow out of the beef or lamb bones. Tell that to the youth of today and they wouldn't believe you . . . but then MacDonald had a farm not a takeaway
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    Re: 4 Foods Americans Don't Eat Much Anymore

    Post by Jan1 on Sun Aug 30 2015, 11:51

    ... memories can be so good sometimes. As children we always used to fight over the marrow bones in my mums absolutely delicious stews - of course they have been off menu for some years now due to CJD ... and the "small risk from bone marrow, of course, for a while T-bone steaks were banned."

    http://patient.info/doctor/creutzfeldt-jakob-disease

    All the best Jan
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    Re: 4 Foods Americans Don't Eat Much Anymore

    Post by chris c on Sun Aug 30 2015, 18:39

    Of course the other side of the coin is how many things are now regarded as food which weren't previously on the menu.

    J Stanton whose blog I intend to reread shortly has some great one-liners, like "Eat Like A Predator, Not Like Prey"

    My all time favourite has to be "birdseed and diesel fuel are NOT food groups"

      Current date/time is Wed Aug 23 2017, 14:52