The Low Carb Diabetic

Promoting a low carb high fat lifestyle for the safe control of diabetes. Eat whole fresh food, more drugs are not the answer.


Welcome to the Low Carb Diabetic forum,have you signed up yet? if not then sign up and join us in the low carb community today!

    NHS dental treatment - what are you entitled to?

    Share
    avatar
    Jan1
    Member

    Status :
    Online
    Offline

    Female Posts : 4094
    Join date : 2014-08-13

    NHS dental treatment - what are you entitled to?

    Post by Jan1 on Wed Apr 22 2015, 14:29


    We Brits don't have the best reputation when it comes to our pearly whites, but there's really no excuse for not looking after your teeth. Not all treatments are included on the National Health Service though, so if you're unsure what you're entitled to, here's what you need to know.

    What's included in NHS treatment?

    First off, you should get regular check-ups where the dentist can examine your mouth, teeth and gums, and give advice about lifestyle changes or keeping your teeth clean and healthy. Though not free, these examinations are relatively cheap, and should be offered at least every six months, although it could be more frequent.

    The rule of thumb is if it's clinically necessary, you can get the treatment on the NHS. That means that preventive treatment (such as scale and polish), fillings, crowns and bridges, root canal treatment and dentures are all available, as is orthodontic treatment such as teeth straightening for children and young people under the age of 18. If your dentist suggests a visit to the hygienist, check to see whether it is a clinically necessary treatment before you decide whether to pay.

    Cosmetic treatments that are not considered clinically necessary - for example, teeth whitening - are not offered on the NHS. For this reason, many people decide to combine the two, getting the cheaper NHS treatment for some, and paying for a private dentist for the cosmetic work. The quality of NHS treatment should be just as high as private treatment, and provided your dentist takes NHS patients, they cannot refuse necessary treatment on the NHS and advise that you need to go private.

    What are the costs?

    The price of NHS dental treatment is split into three bands, depending on what is required. Band 1, which includes examination, diagnosis (including X-rays), preventive advice, scale and polish if necessary, and fissure sealant, costs £18.50. You are also entitled to urgent care. For more extensive treatment such as fillings, root canal work or extractions (band 2), you should expect to pay as much as £50.50 per treatment. And for the likes of crowns, dentures and bridges, the cost could be as much as £219. Prices may vary from region to region, though Wales, Northern Ireland and Scotland all use similar banding schemes.

    If you are under 18, or under 19 and in full-time education, pregnant or have had a baby within the last year, are staying in an NHS hospital where treatment is carried out by the hospital dentist, or are an NHS hospital dental service outpatient (dentures and bridges excluded), you are entitled to free treatment.

    Those receiving income support, income-related employment and support allowance, income-based jobseeker's allowance, universal credit or pension credit, may not have to pay. And if you are on a low income, you may be eligible to receive financial support via the NHS Low Income Scheme, for which you will need an HC2 certificate. If you think you may qualify, visit your local Jobcentre Plus or NHS hospital to find out more and get an HC1 form to complete

    Getting treatment

    There are many NHS dentists across the country, and to find your nearest practice, you can search the NHS Choices website. This could be a dentist close to where you live, or wherever is more practical, i.e. near your workplace

    Once you're registered, it's important to be clear about what is included on the NHS and what is not, so don't be afraid to ask questions of your dentist. Make sure you know exactly what your dental problems are, what the treatment options are, and how much you will have to pay, checking what is included on the NHS and what is not. If you need substantial work done, it's worth checking how much further treatment might be should you have any problems. Some NHS dentists offer the chance to spread payments to make treatment more affordable, so do ask for a complete written breakdown of the costs involved.

    Though dental treatment is not free, it's important to look after your teeth and keep your gums and mouth healthy

    Original article above can be found here http://hotsearch.aol.co.uk/2015/04/13/nhs-dental-treatment-what-are-you-entitled-to/


    I've yet to meet anyone who likes going to the dentist, and I often wonder how the dentist must feel when the patient walks in ... the dentist knows they really don't want to be there but it is a 'necessary evil'.

    I saw this article and though not diabetes related thought it may be of interest Smile

    All the best Jan

    Sharon
    Member

    Status :
    Online
    Offline

    Posts : 102
    Join date : 2014-09-30

    Re: NHS dental treatment - what are you entitled to?

    Post by Sharon on Wed Apr 22 2015, 19:03

    helpful information . some have trouble getting a nhs dentist . we should all look after our teeth .
    avatar
    Jan1
    Member

    Status :
    Online
    Offline

    Female Posts : 4094
    Join date : 2014-08-13

    Re: NHS dental treatment - what are you entitled to?

    Post by Jan1 on Fri Mar 11 2016, 17:42

    I still do not think it easy to find an NHS Dentist these days ... and it often isn't that 'cheap' when attending a Dentist is it ...

    But come April 1st 2016 some NHS Charges are going to rise ... including prescription charges too!

    Saw this article, thought you may want to read it  Exclamation  

    NHS dental charges in England will rise 5% for each of the next two years, the Government has announced, while prescriptions will also rise this year.
    Prescriptions will jump from £8.20 to £8.40 from April 1, and there will be a rise for wigs and optical vouchers.

    The charge for a band 1 course of dental treatment - which covers an examination, diagnosis and, if necessary, X-rays or a scale and polish - will rise from £18.90 to £19.70, and in 2017/18 from £19.70 to £20.60.

    A band 2 course of treatment - which covers all treatment in band 1, plus procedures such as fillings, root canal treatment and removing teeth - will increase from £51.30 to £53.90, and in 2017/18 from £53.90 to £56.30.

    Band 3 - which covers all treatment covered by bands 1 and 2, plus more complex procedures such as crowns, dentures and bridges - will increase from £222.50 to £233.70, and in 2017/18 from £233.70 to £244.30.

    The British Dental Association (BDA) criticised the move and said dentistry was facing the biggest hike.

    Henrik Overgaard-Nielsen, chairman of the BDA's general dental practice committee, said: "This unprecedented hike in dental charges will only serve to discourage the patients that are most in need of care. "This money doesn't go to NHS dentists - they are being asked to play the role of tax collector, while our patients are singled out to subsidise the health service. "We can't tell them how this extra money will be spent, and whether a penny of it will actually end up improving dental care or access to dental services.
    "For Government, these increases may be a source of easy money but they will only undermine the relationship between patients and practitioners.

    "These charges were first introduced in 1951 to limit demand for NHS dentistry, and that's precisely what they do best. Government has given patients another reason to avoid visiting their dentist."
    The Government said dental charges remain "an important contribution to the overall cost of dental services".

    Community and social care minister Alistair Burt said: "NHS dental treatment will remain free for those under the age of 18, those under the age of 19 and receiving full-time education, pregnant women or those who have had a baby in the previous 12 months, and those on qualifying low-income benefits.
    "If someone does not qualify for these exemptions, full or partial help may be available through the NHS Low Income Scheme."

    On prescriptions, he said 90% of prescription items are dispensed free.

    He added: "To ensure that those with the greatest need, and who are not already exempt from the charge, are protected, we have frozen the cost of the prescription prepayment certificates (PPC) for another year.
    "The three-month PPC remains at £29.10 and the cost of the annual PPC will stay at £104. Taken together, this means prescription charge income is expected to rise broadly in line with inflation.
    "Charges for wigs and fabric supports will also be increased by an overall 1.7%.
    "The range of NHS optical vouchers available to children, people on low incomes and individuals with complex sight problems are also being increased in value. In order to continue to provide help with the cost of spectacles and contact lenses, optical voucher values will rise by an overall 1%."

    Article from here
    http://money.aol.co.uk/2016/03/11/nhs-dental-charges-in-england-to-rise-5-for-each-of-the-next-two-years/
    avatar
    chris c
    Member

    Status :
    Online
    Offline

    Posts : 3098
    Join date : 2015-07-26

    Re: NHS dental treatment - what are you entitled to?

    Post by chris c on Mon Mar 14 2016, 00:39

    My old, brilliant, dentist, tried to continue doing NHS work as long as possible, and at one stage he took on a new partner because he was getting so much business.

    Then the NHS changed the way they were paid, and further restricted the treatment options, so reluctantly he knocked it on the head. I found private wasn't as expensive as it might have been, for example he was able to do fillings using modern technology rather than amalgam which lasts a lot longer and doesn't need redoing every few years. Plus he used to enrol us in studies which either paid money or gave us free treatment.

    One of them was very interesting, one of the toothpastes tested was so much better than the other that the trial quickly unblinded itself. This never went into production. He reckoned it was probably a "proof of concept" trial but the good stuff was too expensive to put into mass production. The closest thing that actually did hit the market was I think Aquafresh Ultimate.

    My mother still went to an NHS dentist, and was called in to sit in a portacabin for half a day until someone surveyed her mouth, I was told they were looking for "unauthorised" work and techniques which would have led to prosecution for the dentist actually improving their patients' teeth.

    One big major thing about low carbing is that my teeth no longer fall apart and hardly even need cleaning - far from uncommon.

    Apparently it was expected that low fat diets would cause an increase in dental problems but this was seen as "trivial" compared to the massive reductions is heart disease, obesity and diabetes. Er . . .
    avatar
    Jan1
    Member

    Status :
    Online
    Offline

    Female Posts : 4094
    Join date : 2014-08-13

    Re: NHS dental treatment - what are you entitled to?

    Post by Jan1 on Mon Mar 14 2016, 17:33

    I too find that since going 'LCHF' almost eight years ago,my teeth have shown improvement.
    My dentist is very pro 'give up sugars', he always has been but we now also discuss diet / lifestyle too.
    He is highly into cycling and is not only interested in teeth but in general health and fitness too.

    For some reason it was always a 'Colgate' brand in the house, but on dentist advice I did change to Sensodyme some years back ...
    I guess we all have our favourites - what suits us best.

    All the best Jan
    avatar
    chris c
    Member

    Status :
    Online
    Offline

    Posts : 3098
    Join date : 2015-07-26

    Re: NHS dental treatment - what are you entitled to?

    Post by chris c on Mon Mar 14 2016, 23:24

    My guy's opinion was that there wasn't usually much difference between any of the toothpastes on the market, up until this trial. He also believed that there was a strong genetic factor in how much plaque you got. My current guy is quite interested in the improvements I have shown since low carbing, but unlike the podiatrists I don't think he will be recommending it.

    It's interesting how non-NHS medical professionals are often much more thoughtful than the NHS ones tied to their Rules and dogma.
    avatar
    Jan1
    Member

    Status :
    Online
    Offline

    Female Posts : 4094
    Join date : 2014-08-13

    Re: NHS dental treatment - what are you entitled to?

    Post by Jan1 on Sat Apr 02 2016, 11:28

    There is always adverts for toothpaste on the TV and quite a few about the newer whitening toothpastes that are available ... but care should be taken if considering how you are going to get a whiter smile!

    I read this today ...

    "Rogue beauticians are offering teeth whitening using dangerous DIY kits sold online, councils have warned.
    The kits can contain up to 300 times the legal limit of hydrogen peroxide, which is like "brushing with bleach".

    Simon Blackburn, from the Local Government Association, said councils want to see the Government introduce harsher punishments to unlicensed staff who perform the treatment with illegal kits.
    Professional dentists are the only people legally allowed to perform teeth whitening services at a business premise.

    Mr Blackburn said: "People need to be made more aware of the laws and dangers on teeth whitening, with rogue practitioners given tougher sentences and larger fines.
    "Illegal DIY teeth whitening kits may promise fast results and a brighter smile but those containing dangerous levels of hydrogen peroxide are the equivalent of brushing with bleach and can put oral health at risk.
    "Trading standards are determined to remove any DIY teeth whitening kits with dangerous levels of hydrogen peroxide from the market and will always seek to prosecute those involved in making and selling them.
    "These whitening kits are enabling unlicensed practitioners, including some beauty salons, to cash in on the treatment, and some are using illegal gels.
    "Anyone considering having their teeth whitened should only have it done by a dentist or another regulated dental professional."

    High level bleaching gels can cause mouth infections, blistering and burns to gums, damage to nerves and tooth enamel, and gum-shrinking.
    Warwickshire County Council alone seized more than 15,000 dangerous teeth whitening kits between May 2015 and February 2016, bound for shops, salons and homes.
    Some of the kits contained more than 33% hydrogen peroxide - the maximum legal limit for use by the public in the UK is 0.1%, or 6% for dentists and other registered practitioners.

    Story from here
    http://www.aol.co.uk/news/2016/04/01/warning-over-dangerous-and-illegal-diy-teeth-whitening-kits/

      Current date/time is Sat Aug 19 2017, 23:23